Holy Shenanigans with Pastor Tara Eastman | Episode 30

Holy Shenanigans with Pastor Tara Eastman | Episode 30

Are you curious and wanting to learn more about Pastors that are women? How does feminism and religion intersect? What can you remember in the face of criticism?

In this podcast episode, Billy and Brandy Eldridge speak with Pastor Tara Eastman about Holy Shenanigans

Meet Pastor Tara Eastman

Tara Lamont Eastman is a pastor, feminist and creative. She/her is ELCA minister in central New York who has a background in social work, teaching, arts, and music.

She has a new podcast called Holy Shenanigans that discusses the spiritual and sacred – that is never stuffy.

Listen to her podcast.

Connect on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and TikTok @holyshenanigans

In This Podcast

Summary

  • Feminism and being a pastor
  • Why is there a fear around women stepping into leadership roles?
  • How do you build resilience against criticism?

Feminism and being a pastor

Historically speaking in the Christian church, the first creature [to find Jesus] was a woman, so you know, I’m just trying to do right by Mary.

For Pastor Tara, feminism is treating women as people.

Why is there a fear around women stepping into leadership roles?

I think there’s western civilization, like America and Christianity right, and there’s so much tied up in that idea that is not necessarily – and this is kind of a revolutionary thought – the heart of Christianity. (Tara)

The heart of Christianity is loving your neighbor, yourself, and God. Jesus did a lot by speaking up for women. There are so many examples of Him raising and lifting up people, women included. Pastor Tara thinks Jesus would want everyday people to do, men and women working together.

How do you build resilience against criticism?

Pastor Tara recites that nothing will separate you from the love of God.

If you want to receive a coloring fish freebie as mentioned in this podcast, please email betamalerevolution@gmail.com

Books mentioned in this episode

Are you ready to find the freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your skin and be the most authentic beta male, then our free beta revolution course is for you. Sign up for free.

Useful links:

Meet Billy Eldridge

billy-eldridge

Meet Billy, the resident beta male. For Billy, this is a place to hang out with other beta males and the people who love them. We’re redefining what beta males look like in the world. I have learned to embrace my best beta self, and I can help you to do the same. As a therapist, I understand the need to belong. You belong here. Join the REVOLUTION.

Meet Brandy Eldridge

brandy-eldridge

Hello, Beta friends. I am an alpha personality who is embracing the beta way of life. I feel alive when connected with people, whether that is listening to their stories or learning about their passions. Forget small talk, let’s go deep together. Come to the table and let’s have some life-changing conversations.

Thanks for listening!

Did you enjoy this podcast? Feel free to leave a comment below or share this podcast on social media! You can also leave a review of the Beta Male Revolution Podcast on iTunes and subscribe!

Podcast Transcription

[BILLY]:
Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a family of podcasts seeking to change the world. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

Well, guys, we’re diving back into the world of faith today. We have another pastor, a member of clergy on the show today. You may be asking yourself, why…? I think this is our third pastor on the show, and you may ask, why, on Beta Male Revolution, would you have so many talks about faith and spirituality? And we always want to be honest with you about our journey. And part of that has been our faith journey, growing up in church, and things getting very confusing, and feeling torn, and coming back around to a belief in something that’s different, but the same, and what we grew up with. And we know a lot of people go through those struggles. In my professional life at Olive Tree Counseling, here in Texarkana, Texas, that’s one of the areas I focus on – faith deconstruction, crisis of faith, loss of faith, providing a non judgmental space with someone who’s not going to tell you what you should believe, or need to believe, but trust in you and your ability to walk that out on your own . But I often provide an office and a space where people can do that, and they don’t have to be alone. And so if you ever want to check that out, you can go over to olivetreetxk.com and reach out. Whether you’re in Texarkana or not, we do facilitate consulting around those types of conversations.

And so, on our journey of seeking out truth and what’s this life all about, we reach out to people we find interesting, who can help fill in some of the gaps for us. For all the things I see about faith out in the world that make me want to run away from it, there’s certain stories, people’s stories, people’s journeys, that won’t allow me to completely let it go because there’s something there. There’s a pull and a tug towards there being something more to this thing than just this life. So join us today as we go on this journey with Pastor Tara. And if you have any questions, email us. If you haven’t gotten a chance to, go rate and review; that helps us out a little bit. So over on Apple podcast. A lot of the books that we talk about are on our website, and you can go to the book section and go through those and a lot of them have to do with faith struggles. So go check that reading list out. Join us today with Pastor Tara.

[BILLY]:
Hey, Beta Male Revolution. It’s Brandy and I today and, holy shenanigans, we have Pastor Tara.

[BRANDY]:
Pastor Tara, how are you? We’re so… I’m so excited. We’re both excited. I’ve been waiting for this.

[PASTOR TARA]:
I have been too. It’s been such a wild ride in regard to jumping into podcasting about thirty days ago. And then getting to know you guys a little bit. It’s been wonderful.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. And let me just say congratulations on five hundred listens because as we’ve been doing this for right about a year, that’s a big deal thirty days in, so that’s awesome.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Thank you. I have to give a shout out to Ian Eastman, my husband and engineer, without his help this would not be happening.

[BRANDY]:
All right, thanks, Ian.

[BILLY]:
Well. And I started it out with holy shenanigans, because that’s the name of your podcast. And we just want to talk to you about your story as a pastor, and your podcast, and your journey from a musician and an artist to becoming a pastor and starting a podcast. So where do you want to start today?

[PASTOR TARA]:
Well, that’s a really good question. So, I think I’ve always been an artist, to be honest. I mean, whenever I could make anything when I was little, I would be super happy to make anything out of, I mean, I even made puppets out of, like, socks in my mom’s sewing box. But I grew up in a pretty rural place, so you had to use the mediums that you had. Yeah, so I have loved making and creating things since I was little and so that works its way into expressing myself through art and music, but also now through the opportunity with Holy Shenanigans, this podcast.

[BRANDY]:
So who were you before you were the Rev?

[PASTOR TARA]:
Who was I? I was a waitress. I am a mom of two now grown young adults. I am Yaya to my grandson who is seven. And, like I said, I’ve been a musician as well. I was once in a Christian rock band with the hair to prove it.

[BRANDY]:
I want to know, I want to know about this. I want to know where you played. What was your hit song? I want to know.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Well, I don’t think we ever had any hit songs. But we got paid in like, you know, hotdogs and s’mores for youth events.

[BRANDY]:
That’s awesome. That’s awesome. Because I remember being in the youth group and I wanted to date the people in the band, the worship band, the church band, the camp band. I mean, those were, like, those were the cool kids.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, well, maybe that’s why you’re married to me because once as a youth, I joined up with YWAM, Youth With A Mission, and I got to open for Cathy Tripoli in a concert.

[BRANDY]:
In a choir.

[BILLY]:
In a choir. And Cathy Tripoli was like, not quite an Amy Grant. She was, like, a few levels down. Sorry, Cathy.

[PASTOR TARA]:
So I do know Cathy Tripoli. And I almost went to YWAM when I was like eighteen, nineteen years old.

[BRANDY]:
Really?

[BILLY]:
What do you know, props to you for the mission.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Yeah, no joke.

[BRANDY]:
So take us on that journey. You’re eighteen or nineteen, almost going to YWAM, when do you get the call? When do you know the ministry is what you want to go into?

[PASTOR TARA]:
So I went to a concert at a community college in western New York when I was about eighteen years old – seventeen, eighteen. And Scott Wesley Brown, and I believe he was connected with YWAM at one point, he was the performing artist there that evening. And he was standing on this stage in a very humble way with his acoustic guitar, and just telling his story about being the hands and feet of Jesus in the world. And I couldn’t really hear him well because my heart was pounding so hard. Like I just was like, what is this about? I need to know more about this. And so that was really why I thought I would go into missions, initially. And also growing up in the Baptist Church, that was my path as a female in ministry, at that point. I couldn’t have gone into ordained ministry at that point, in that church. So yeah, Scott Wesley Brown. I don’t even remember what he said, but there was just this deep sense of call to love people in Jesus’ name in real ways.

And that led to, I mean, it led to being a singer in a Christian band, where we got, you know, paid in s’mores, to, I ended up working in youth ministry for about twenty years in various capacities, starting when I was like nineteen. And that all one thing led to another, which eventually, through three different denominations, where I landed eventually at the Lutheran Church, the ELCA. And I had an opportunity to go to seminary and I had some help with a grant to go because it was really expensive and at that point, I didn’t have the resources to even consider that. And the doors opened up. And so that’s part of why I became a Lutheran pastor. Also, there’s also the emphasis on God’s grace, which I think is the best message around. And there is a connection to both the difficult things of life as well as the joys in a really real way that I appreciate so much in their theology and in worship, too. Yeah, it’s that saint and sinner part of Lutheran theology that I think is just really honest about the human condition.

[BILLY]:
Oh, thank you. Yeah, man, grace these days. I need it. I don’t know about Brandy, but we didn’t grow up with… I don’t know, at times, it seems like we were missing that grace message some, growing up in a little more traditional churches. So tell me, I have two questions. What was the name of your Christian band?

[PASTOR TARA]:
So it was… One manifestation of it was Prime Minister.

[BRANDY]:
I want that band getting back together so I can wear the T-shirt. That’s awesome.

[PASTOR TARA]:
We didn’t have a merch table, we were that…

[BRANDY]:
But you do now. I’ll be selling your merch. That’s fantastic.

[BILLY]:
I’m gonna let the cat out of the bag on how cool I am. I am on a Facebook message board that has Christian memes and one of them had Christian rock music is the turkey bacon of music? I don’t know if that’s true or not. That was pretty… it was pretty harsh.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Yeah, yeah.

[BILLY]:
So, second question was, so, growing up in a church where you couldn’t have been a pastor, moving to where you are a pastor now, where was that shift and when did your eyes come open to I can be a pastor?

[PASTOR TARA]:
Yeah. So part of my journey was with the Salvation Army. I worked for them in youth ministry but I also worked in a program called Children and Family Outreach Program, which helped kids that were in domestic violence or other abuse situations. And so half my job was working in social work, the other half was working in ministry, with the Salvation Army. But just before I started working in youth ministry, oh, this is a great story. So my husband and I moved to the town where we spent a big chunk of our first married life, and having our kids and raising our kids, and we’d just moved to this town and we were looking for a church that was community centric, that was close. And so we said to each other, why don’t we pray about it and see where the spirit might lead us to go to church? And so, apart from one another, we kind of did some research. And a friend who was a youth director invited me to what’s called Cradle Roll. Do you guys know what Cradle Roll is?

[BILLY]:
No.

[PASTOR TARA]:
It’s kind of like a Mommy and Me group for like, little toddlers and their moms to come and just kind of talk to other adults, and the kids play, kind of like a little play group. So I go to the play group at the Salvation Army and my husband is working… one of the many jobs he worked at that time is working in radio, and he was listening to worship from a church in that area. So we get back together, you know, a week or so or two after the initial experiment of where we felt the spirit was leading us to go to church. And I was kind of like, oh, man, it’s not going to be this place and I’ve already made some friends. And he goes, hey, I have never even heard about this church. I didn’t even though it was a church. But he goes, the Salvation Army, I think we should try that. And I’m like, dude, that’s where I’ve been going. Right. And so it’s a crazy, crazy story.

But one of the coolest things, to get back to your question about being a woman and becoming a pastor, is that was the first place that I saw a woman preach. And I was like, well, of course she should. As soon as I saw it, those boundaries and limitations, unfortunately, that I had experienced previously, were just kind of like, the doors were blown open. And while theologically my perspective is quite different now than it was when I was working and serving with the Salvation Army – there’s lots of reasons why I respect the work that they do – but theologically, the Lutheran Church really became my home, and a place for me to live into that spirit of God’s grace, and also that social justice focus as well. But I have to thank Major Pat Davis for being the first woman preacher that I saw. And she encouraged me to pursue that. I’m very, very thankful for her helping me to kind of sort out that call and to kind of break out of those human imposed barriers that I think a lot of times we can become stuck in.

[BRANDY]:
As the resident alpha female on the podcast, we had another alpha female Lutheran minister on our podcast, Nadia Bolz-Weber, and she was the founder of House for all Sinners and Saints, and you had mentioned sinners and saints. And you had said that there was something in that, that kind of pulled you in. Will you explain to me the meaning, sinners and saints together?

[PASTOR TARA]:
Yeah, it’s kind of like two sides of a single coin. It says that, you know, in God’s eyes were always saint, beloved, right? And we’re all also human, sinner, on the other side of that coin. We’re all that and the Spirit of God loves and embraces all of us. And I really feel that what grabbed me in that is that sometimes in church, growing up feeling judged for being just myself, or being more alpha than many women were supposed to be in that tradition, when I heard that, and experienced that grace and that saint and sinner, and still beloved by God, that just blew my mind. Yeah.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, I felt the same thing on the other end, because I wasn’t an alpha guy. And I was a little more feeling and emotional, trying to find my place and that role, because it seems like for us, at least, growing up, church kind of gave us defined roles and boxes that we were supposed to fit into. And if we didn’t, you didn’t have much room to go from there. So for you, what does feminism and being a pastor, how does that go hand in hand? And what does that mean to you?

[PASTOR TARA]:
So feminism, for me, is the crazy idea that women are people.

[BRANDY]:
Get out of here.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Can you imagine that women are human beings and should be treated as such? And yeah, and so, as a woman who also loves the resurrection story, of who actually found Jesus? And then [unclear] the people? Who was the first preacher, my friends?

[BRANDY]:
Mary. Mary Magdalene.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Yes, yes. So, historically speaking in the Christian Church, the first preacher was a woman. So, you know, I’m just trying to do right by Mary.

[BRANDY]:
That’s good. I’m going to use that.

[BILLY]:
So my question would be, why are these, in some places, like, revolutionary ideas? And why is there fear around this idea of women stepping up into leadership roles? What happened? Why do they have to? Why haven’t they been there all along? And what can we do to help spread a message of that inclusivity, and just more of it?

[PASTOR TARA]:
That’s a very big question, Billy. Yeah, I mean, I think there are cultural reasons as to why any particular group that is in power wants to stay in power. They don’t want to lose out on what privilege and experience that they do have. And so, I think sometimes, and this is just an idea I keep thinking about as of late, is that I think that there’s like Western civilization, like, American Christianity, right? And there’s so much tied up in that idea that is not necessarily, and this is kind of a revolutionary thought, it’s not necessarily the heart of Christianity. You know, like, I’m trying to think of a way to explain that better. But does that make some sense?

[BILLY]:
Yeah, absolutely.

[BRANDY]:
So, go to the heart of Christianity. What is it?

[PASTOR TARA]:
You know, love God with all of your heart, strength, and mind and love your neighbor as you love yourself. When the young man went to Jesus and he was saying, well, you know, I’ve done all these [unclear] right. I’ve done all that and I’ve done all that. And Jesus says, this is the law summed up [unclear]. And Jesus, he did a lot for speaking up and for lifting up the voices of women. If you look at Jesus’ story, you know. The Samaritan woman at the well. Mary, all the Mary’s. There’s so many examples. I mean, even the story where he heals a little girl, you know, little girl, get up. Everybody thinks she’s dead. And he says, Talitha, wake up, you know, Talitha, come. And she gets up and she has a sandwich, you know? It’s that lifting up of one another. And I think, in regards to the work that you guys are doing, alphas and betas, we got to work together. Men and women, we got to work together, or however you identify, gender wise, we’ve got to work together because there’s an awful lot of need in the world. And people, I think – especially in light of the pandemic, and even political and different situations that we’re facing in the United States – people are really longing for love and connection. And I think Jesus would have us do that in a way that is authentic and sincere. And so I think that’s part of lifting up those voices that are not heard, including, you know, women preachers, but women preachers are actually pretty vocal once they have the microphone.

[BRANDY]:
Imagine that. Imagine they have something to say.

[BILLY]:
So, in your journey, did you ever have a crisis of faith, a walking away and a coming back? Or has it been pretty steady for you?

[PASTOR TARA]:
I think… So, I have this old blog, and I called it Uphill Idealist, so, I know, I talk about blogs, I don’t even know…

[BRANDY]:
No, that’s… I’m thinking of the title and I’m thinking it’s like a realistic optimist [unclear].

[PASTOR TARA]:
Right. Because I know that life is challenging. I mean, I was on my own from the time I was eighteen until my husband and I got married. And like I said, I was a waitress, he worked at a radio station. So we have understood and known struggle and challenge. And it’s been this very long journey of God working in my life and saying… It’s almost kind of like, you know, peeling away those layers of an onion, or there’s a quote, Roca says, “Live into the questions like they’re books written in languages that you don’t understand yet.” That was my call kind of quote that carried me through, you know, at seventeen, feeling called into missions and that kind of being tossed to the wind because I needed to go get a job when I was eighteen. And going from that to working in youth ministry, and going from there thinking I was going to go to seminary in one tradition and then another tradition and the bottom fell out of the plans for that. There has been a lot of ups and downs, and even my process to become a Lutheran pastor. I mean, there’s the seminary part, right? But then there’s a whole process called ‘candidacy’, and that process for me, took me almost eight years to get through.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah, I have heard, like, it is intense. It’s very difficult. There’s a lot of steps, a lot of confirmation and checks and balances that go along the way.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Yes, indeed. Which, I mean, there’s great things like a psych eval at the beginning, which I think is so important. They’re really good. But it’s a lot of steps. And being a female seeking a call in pastoral ministry, who was relatively new to the Lutheran Church, it took a long time to get the street cred for people to say, oh, okay, yeah, you are Lutheran. So, you know, because I had gone from Baptist background to Salvation Army to Presbyterian to Lutheran in my vocation.

[BRANDY]:
You kind of experienced it all.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Yeah, I mean, and thinking about God’s presence, there have been lots of ups and downs in my life. Times where I just felt like the odd duck, you know, not knowing exactly how these different things that I thought were super cool would somehow make sense and be able to be used to be the hands of Jesus in the world. And sometimes I kind of, like, really? How did this happen? This kid from Northwestern Pennsylvania, you know, four miles away from the one stoplight town, you know, to being a pastor of a church in Central New York. Like, that’s amazing to me.

[BRANDY]:
Isn’t that, I wonder too, like, the question most people ask, like, isn’t that some of our biggest insecurity, is an imposter syndrome? Who am I that I should be anything and anybody? And yet, there you are, there we are. And I wonder if that just resonates with everyone? That we all have that in us, that we question?

[PASTOR TARA]:
I totally agree. I just talked about it just a week ago, on [unclear] on the podcast, I talked about that, you know, who was I to do this big project? Who was I to lead people? That’s in that story? And that’s a big question. That’s that imposter syndrome, or I call it the voice of the critic.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah. Yeah. The inner critic.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Yeah. And so I have a hack for the critic, at least…

[BRANDY]:
Do tell.

[BILLY]:
We want it.

[BRANDY]:
We want it. Mine is an angry British woman that gets on to me all the time. She’s constantly telling me in a mean, British voice, I didn’t do it right.

[PASTOR TARA]:
So this is a thing I used to teach my students when I would do art and after school programs, because everybody would say, I’m not an artist, right? Or they’d be really critical of themselves and say, I can’t draw. And so I’d say, so, imagine the voice of your critic. Imagine… and sometimes I’ll even have them draw their critic, like, draw a picture of it, like, a goblin, or whatever it was, or the British lady like you have, Brandy. But I would say, you know, what works for me sometimes when they’re really, really loud, I imagine giving them all sorts of, like, taffy and just shoving it in their mouth and letting them chew on it and so I can go get some work done.

[BRANDY]:
It’s good.

[BILLY]:
I loved it.

[BRANDY]:
It’s good. I’m gonna keep a bowl of taffy next to me.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Just, yeah. Give it to the critic. It’ll be better for your teeth.

[BILLY]:
I think my critic is probably a person of power, a male, over me, who I’ve disappointed.

[BRANDY]:
I’m so glad you didn’t say it was your wife. Thank you.

[BILLY]:
No, no, no, you’re my encourager. But the wonderful thing about that is that person came in and kind of hijacked that. It was an older, powerful person in a twelve step program that I walked into. And he told me I was one of God’s kids and he loved me. And I try to remember that voice more than the critical one. And I guess that is my stuffing of the taffy into the loud, resounding critic and I have to remember that. And kind of going with that, and the world we live in, and this will be coming out a couple days after the election – as we sit here right now, we have no idea what’s gonna happen, we will know then – but either way, you know, how do you build resilience against cynicism, when you do want to give up? And this is like a selfish question. Because that creeps up in me, this… But when you were telling me the story about feeling called, and how you’re falling in love with Jesus in this story, I felt that, and I feel a little bit of myself going, yes, more of that. But then the cynicism creeps in, of the world and the noise. So if you could just pastor us for a couple of minutes. How do you work against that?

[PASTOR TARA]:
So there’s a great verse from Romans, and I’m not gonna say it exactly right, but it goes on this long list of things. You know, there’s height, there’s depth, there’s all sorts of things. You could list your mortgage, you could say your taxes, whatever you would like to toss in, all these things that put barriers. Politics, hatred, racism, sexism, all those things. But nothing will separate you from the love of God which is in Christ Jesus. Right?

[BRANDY]:
Yeah.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Nothing will separate you from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus and through the power of the Holy Spirit. Yeah.

[BILLY]:
I needed that today. I’m gonna take it in.

[BRANDY]:
That’s good.

[BILLY]:
So, in wrapping up and closing, I got a couple questions for you and then I’m gonna let you lead us out. And the first question being, up until this point, as a pastor, as a human, as someone out there making change in the world, what’s the hardest lesson you’ve had to learn?

[PASTOR TARA]:
Hmm. I think allowing time for things to just improve and change. I sometimes get into a big old rush, and I want it all to be good now. But it’s a long haul, this work of, like the beloved John Lewis, you know, good trouble, keep at it. But it takes a lifetime, if not more. I think that having patience in that and learning how to ask for help. That’s a hard one for me. When I was a little girl, I mean, I think I was probably three-years-old, and I said to my mom, when she was trying to help me. I don’t know, you guys don’t know me real well, but I said something to her. It’s so arrogant. I said, “Really, Mother, I’d rather do it myself.” At three, okay? So, learning how to ask for help, and not having to be responsible for it all is a big deal.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah.

[PASTOR TARA]:
I’m working on this podcast with my husband, right? I couldn’t get it done without his help with the engineering. And he couldn’t do it without my stories. And some days when you lose your whole recording into the cloud and you have to re record it again.

[BRANDY]:
At least you didn’t have a guest on.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Right, right. But yeah, asking for help, that’s important.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, I think having a podcast for us has been a true test of our marriage, and our ability to work with one another because we fluctuated between what, total chaos and coming back around to complete connection and love.

[BRANDY]:
I’d like to say, by the time I got up this morning until now, how many times we almost got divorced, like, that’s what we try to work against. So if yesterday it was four, today we’re going to try for three. It’s progress, not perfection. I want to know, when you’re alone in the car, and there’s a song that comes on, what is your jam? What is it that nobody else is around and you just sing with all your might?

[PASTOR TARA]:
Oh, man. That’s, oh, boy, there’s so many choices.

[BRANDY]:
Well, just name one.

[PASTOR TARA]:
So there is a Christian band called Adam Again. And I don’t know if you guys ever heard of Adam Again.

[BRANDY]:
No.

[BILLY]:
We’re gonna be looking them up.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Or the 77s. Anything by the 77s. The song is called… it’s called Pray Naked. It’s a great [unclear].

[BRANDY]:
I like it already.

[BILLY]:
There we go.

[BRANDY]:
That’s fantastic.

[BILLY]:
We’re gonna give them a link when we put the episode out. You’re getting linked to Pray Naked.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Yeah, well, if anything can help Mike Roe and the 77s, anything I can do to help them.

[BILLY]:
Absolutely. Well, in wrapping up, we talked a little earlier, and you want to lead us out.

[BRANDY]:
Well, first, tell people where they can find you.

[PASTOR TARA]:
Oh, yeah. So the podcast is at Holy Shenanigans and it can be found on pretty much any platform for podcasts, and it’s being hosted by Buzzsprout. Yeah, you can find it there.

[BRANDY]:
And then you also have something free for our audience.

[PASTOR TARA]:
I do have something free. So, you know, Beta Male Revolution, um, and my last episode was called Paint the Fish and so I made a coloring page with the beta fish. So that coloring page JPG you can, you know, who doesn’t like a coloring page? So I drew up a little fish.

[BRANDY]:
And it’s so cute and it’s a little beta.

[BILLY]:
We’ll link it up and we’ll put it in the show notes and you guys check it out. And Pastor Tara, thank you so much. Do you want to take us out today?

[PASTOR TARA]:
I would be so happy to. Thank you so much. So this is a blessing, Billy and Brandy, for both betas and alphas too. There our hurts of heart as well as mind that weigh too heavy and steal so much time, like scuffed knees, blisters and breaks. They make us believe we’ve no time, no place. The pain is real, this is true. But even in pain, the water is too. It runs and flows to every space, it washes the wounds that we think we can’t face. The water of life, of love, of hope is something on which we will always be able to float. Mending the broken, finding a way, no matter the trouble, love promises to make away. Amen.

[BILLY]:
Amen. Thank you, Pastor.

[BRANDY]:
Thank you.

[PASTOR TARA]:
You’re welcome.

[BILLY]:
Are you ready to find freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find your strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your own skin and be the most authentic beta male, then our free Beta Male Revolution course is for you. Sign up for free at betamalerevolution.com/course.

This podcast is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. This is given with the understanding that neither the host, Practice of the Practice, or the guest are providing legal, mental health, or other professional information. If you need a professional, you should find one.

Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a network of podcasts seeking to help you thrive, imperfectly. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom Podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

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