Cody Byrns: Author of Scar Release | Episode 20

Cody Byrns: Author of Scar Release | Episode 20

How do you keep your faith and move forward after a trauma? What should you do to heal from the physical and emotional scars? What is the hardest lesson to learn after a tragedy?

In this podcast episode, Billy and Brandy Eldridge speak with Cody Byrns about his book Scar Release: Breaking Free of Yesterday’s Troubles and the experience that led him to write it.

Meet Cody Byrns

Cody Byrns is an internationally recognized speaker, a number one best-selling author, and the founder of The Cody Byrns Foundation for Burn Survivors. In May 2013, Cody’s life was changed drastically after he was rear-ended by a box-truck whilst stopped at a red light on the highway. He was considered dead until first responders saw his hand move. He received many injuries that day, including severe burns to almost 40% of his body. After years of countless surgeries and rehabilitation, Cody has chosen to not allow his scars to keep him bound in bitterness and defeat. Instead, he uses his story to uplift others.

His vision is to help people live free from the bonds of scars (physical and emotional), equipping others with the proper steps to walk out of their past hurt and defeat and run toward their full potential. As a thought leader, he speaks worldwide to provide relevant, applicable, and thought-provoking messages.

Visit Cody’s website, connect on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.

In This Podcast

Summary

  • Getting involved with the ministry
  • Questioning God after his accident
  • Moving forward and keeping the faith
  • The aftershock
  • Cody’s life today
  • The hardest thing that Cody had to learn

Getting involved with the ministry

Cody grew up going to church with his cousins before his parents were saved, when they took him to kids camp. He saw one of the speakers there who was also a juggler, and that stuck in his mind as something he wanted to do one day. In his younger years, he felt a calling to do clown ministry and gained a lot of confidence through that. He was known for his juggling and comedy, so he honed those skills and continued with clown ministry after high school, where he joined a ministry training program in Illinois. He worked part-time as an associate children’s pastor at his church, while doing additional schooling and getting his pastoral credentials until he started working full-time and traveling for the job.

Questioning God after his accident

I don’t believe God did this to me, I believe we live in a world where things just happen. We, as human beings, we have free will, things will occur, whether I’m a Christian or not a Christian. However, the benefit of being a Christian is I have Jesus to cling to.

Cody does not claim to be a perfect human being or anything like that, but he was definitely trying his best to do everything right in his life, so after his accident he was constantly wondering why it had happened to him and questioning God. Then a pastor from one of the churches he had spoken at before the accident contacted him. He wanted to connect Cody with a fellow burn survivor who had been speaking for years to military personnel and at schools and churches. Cody contacted this man, and he told the story about his burn tragedy which had led to scars on his face and amputated fingers.

One day, this man was on television with a lady who told him that God allowed the accident to happen because He could trust him with the scars. That statement changed his entire life, and made Cody look at his tragedy in the same way. Now, he uses his story in his ministry and displays his scars, including the emotional ones which are often the most difficult ones from which to recover.

Moving forward and keeping the faith

Having such a strong foundation in place from an early age made a big difference for Cody after his accident, as he definitely had a great support system. He also came to understand just how short life is, and that he should use the invaluable time he is given on this Earth to make a difference in others’ lives, which he tries to do through ministry and the bigger audience he can now reach since his accident. With that huge realization about life being so short, Cody also tries to focus on the eternal life that God promises and spreading that message of promise and hope to encourage as many people as he can.

The aftershock

Cody has benefited from not having any conscious recollection of the accident itself, but he still experienced aftershock similar to PTSD, particularly when he had to start driving himself between home and his therapy sessions. Fear kept trying to take control by filling his mind with negative thoughts such as “The last time I was here was whenever my life changed drastically. Do I dare get in the driver’s seat again?” Cody didn’t want to live his life in fear, so he worked on reframing the situation, not letting fear control him, and actively choosing to believe that just because it happened once does not mean it’s going to happen again.

Cody’s life today

Now 30 years old, Cody has seen a lot of remarkable things happen in his life since that experience. He became a best-selling author, got many opportunities to travel, and has spoken to a lot of people in a lot of different places about his experiences. He is extremely grateful for the valuable lessons he has learned along the way and is still learning and growing with God’s guidance and help, especially with speaking to others and making an impact in their lives.

The hardest thing that Cody had to learn

Cody battled with depression after being impatient with his own recovery and lack of progress for a long time. He had to learn to be understanding and patient with the whole process and know that everything that has to happen will happen in due course. He encourages people, no matter what they’re going through, to take these four E.P.I.C. steps:

  1. Embrace Challenges
  2. Provide Perspective
  3. Implement Change
  4. Celebrate and Serve

Books by Cody Byrns

Are you ready to find the freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your skin and be the most authentic beta male, then our free beta revolution course is for you. Sign up for free.

Useful links:

Meet Billy Eldridge

billy-eldridge

Meet Billy, the resident beta male. For Billy, this is a place to hang out with other beta males and the people who love them. We’re redefining what beta males look like in the world. I have learned to embrace my best beta self, and I can help you to do the same. As a therapist, I understand the need to belong. You belong here. Join the REVOLUTION.

Meet Brandy Eldridge

brandy-eldridge

Hello, Beta friends. I am an alpha personality who is embracing the beta way of life. I feel alive when connected with people, whether that is listening to their stories or learning about their passions. Forget small talk, let’s go deep together. Come to the table and let’s have some life-changing conversations.

Thanks for listening!

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Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a network of podcasts seeking to help you thrive, imperfectly. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom Podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

Podcast Transcription

[BILLY]:
Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a family of podcasts seeking to change the world. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom Podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network. Hope everybody’s having a great day, I know we are. I’m sitting here with the lovely and talented Brandy Eldridge.

[BRANDY]:
Hey, boo. I am excited about the guests we have on today, Cody Byrns. So, Cody Byrns is a best selling author, international speaker, founder of The Cody Byrns Foundation for Burn Survivors. And he kind of goes into a story about why he wrote a book and what happened in his life that completely changed it. He was in a car accident, became a burn victim, and has just decided to live this positive life and help others. If you want to read his book, which I highly highly, highly recommend, he also has a study for it. So this is good for study groups, churches, Sunday schools, or anyone who’s dealing in trauma. His book is a number one best selling book. It’s called Scar Release: Breaking Free From Yesterday’s Troubles. And you can find him on Facebook, you can find them on Insta @thecodybyrns, b y r n s. And, just, it was an honor to talk to him. It was hard for me to like put into words things that I wanted to ask him, I don’t know if you have this same thing, because I deal in little traumas and his was like a life changing. Like it’s…

[BILLY]:
Well, for work you deal in big T trauma. And we talk in life how there’s big T and little T and they’re all trauma, and we can acknowledge them both. In our life, we deal with little T traumas. We have a comfortable life but, in our work as professionals, we come in contact with a lot of capital T traumas and a lot of pain. So if you have had trauma, and you have had pain, these types of messages are always encouraging and they instill hope to see people who’ve gotten to the other side and working through it in their journey. You can find this book in the show notes, on our website, and also links to the images of his accident. He speaks about that in there and there’s nothing quite like a picture to show and add to the words that he shares with us. Be sure to rate and review and link up with us on social media.

[BRANDY]:
Don’t write and review if you’re gonna be mean like just go to somebody else. We don’t need any, we need positive stuff. [inaudible]

[BILLY]:
Anyway. Enjoy the show today guys. Hey Beta Male Revolution. Today we have Cody Byrns with us. He’s a best selling author and I can’t wait to get into his story. And he’s going to share a bit with us about his journey and what brought him here today. Cody, how you doing?

[CODY]:
Doing good. I’m glad to be here.

[BRANDY]:
Welcome Cody. We’re so inspired by your story, your book, your videos have been online, like, it’s just an honor to talk with you. So we’re just gonna get right into it. Tell us about your book, Scar Release and why you wrote it.

[CODY]:
Yeah, well, I released the book back in February of 2018. And the, you know I never thought I would write a book, never occurred to me, but I had a tragedy that took place in my life back in 2013. And a lot of what sparked the book came from that experience and the lessons that I learned through that. And so since this time, it’s really been remarkable to see the lives that have been impacted positively through the book, and it’s, you know, it’s my first book, it’s not a hard read, it’s pretty easy. It’s not a big one, but it has had a lot of fun positive results.

[BILLY]:
So Cody, why did you write a book?

[CODY]:
Yeah, so, a lot of people were encouraging me and, like I said, you know, a lot of this experience came back, or it came from the experience that I encountered in 2013. And during that time period, I was a children’s pastor. I was 23 years old and, along with being a children’s minister, I traveled the country, spoke at kids camps, did a lot of fun events. I’m also a professional juggler, and comedian, and so I did that through the years. And so, life was going great and I was stopped at a red light on a highway, it was on a Friday afternoon, May 31st, and I was rear ended by a refrigerator box truck that did not stop. And when the truck hit my car, my car blew up in the flames. And so then when they first responded to the scene, just by the looks of it, they said it’s a fatality. No way anybody can survive this. But however, by the grace of Almighty God, they saw my hand move and they changed their plans. I don’t remember none of this. I just remember driving and then I wake up in the hospital three weeks later. So, during that time period though they life flighted me to a burn unit in Indianapolis, Indiana, where I was put into a coma on full life support. And I had severe burn injuries, my face had second degree burns, which second degree don’t scar, but then I had third and fourth degree burns, and I never knew there was such a thing as a fourth degree burn, but it burns through all your fat cells down to bone and muscle and in some cases it requires amputation. And so along with that I, you know, I had a blood infection, I encountered pneumonia, I had broken vertebrae, torn ligaments, all kinds of issues came about just from this stoplight. Just one Friday afternoon, unexpected tragedy struck. But then I wouldn’t come to until I think it was June 19th. And so, I remember my mother and my family all being there – mother, father, but my mom specifically, she had informed me what had happened and you know, immediately my thought is, I didn’t see this coming. And you wonder why and all these different emotions come to you in that moment. So, from that, that’s really where I start the book. And so, from there, I share all these lessons that I learned from experiencing this to getting to where I am today.

[BILLY]:
Wow. Well, we talk a lot about pivotal moments, and life changes, and first half of life living and second half of life living on our podcast and how sometimes suffering thrusts us into those moments where we do change.

[BRANDY]:
But we’re not, we’re not talking like suffering, like, you know, I lost my job. Like, we’re talking like, suffering that people have not experienced. Like, this is, I mean, your story, your 20 days in the hospital, you don’t even know what’s going on. Like, this is a lot more than just like a pivotal moment, this is life changing in every aspect.

[BILLY]:
And I want to get into that part of your story. But we have to go back a little bit because there’s two things. Professional juggler? We have to know about that. And also, you said you were a children’s pastor, which is a very active job. I grew up in church and had a lot of influential people in my life, and most of those came through my pastor as a child, and my youth pastors. And I interview one of them in the upcoming episodes, I got to find one of my all youth pastors and interviewed him which has been such a fun thing for me, but how did you end up in the ministry? What was your faith journey like? And after the accident, did it change at all or what pivoted for you? Could you go into that a bit?

[CODY]:
Yeah. Well, okay. I grew up in the church. I mean, ever since I could remember, I went to church and you know, my cousins had took me before my mom and dad got saved. And so eventually when they came to know Christ, they started taking me. Went to kids camp and during that time, like I felt that I’d actually seen another, the speaker at the time, at the camp was also a juggler and so that really stuck with me as a little boy. And I said, “Man, someday I would love to do that.” But later on the week, I kind of knew that God was calling me to do something very similar. And so, all through my young years, I practiced on that. I actually started as a clown, did clown ministry and I kind of, you know, gained some confidence. And I even did, I did clown ministry, my goodness, even after high school. I did a few but the juggling and comedy is what people came to know me for. But yeah, honing in on those skills. So, my faith has always been a very important part, even after high school, I went to a ministry training program in Rockford, Illinois. That was for nine months. Completed the program and then from there, I came on to my church as an associate children’s pastor. So it was like a part time kind of job. And during that time, I got my pastoral credentials, did additional schooling, and then I became, like a year or so later, I became full time, along with traveling and doing all these things. So, faith has always been very important to me. I had a very strong foundation, great support system in place. When this tragedy took, you know, you know, it all occurred. It really did, it rocked my faith, it rocked my world, because I never thought I would encounter something like this. Especially when you’re trying everything you can to do life, right. I’m not a perfect human being, I don’t profess to be that but, you know, at the time you know, I tried my best. I, you know, and I, I wondered, I said, “Why? Why God.” And one of my, one of the churches I had spoken at before the accident, the pastor had contacted me and he said, I want to hook you up with a gentleman by the name of Dave Roever. And Dave Roever served in Vietnam, he’s also a burn survivor, and he’s got a powerful ministry. He’s spoken to military personnel, schools, churches, he’s been doing it for years, millions of people have been impacted by him. So, I had a phone call with him and he shared with me his story and how, after his tragedy, where he was burned. You know, his face was scarred, he has fingers amputation, or fingers amputated. And he was on television and the lady asked him, she said, “You know, Dave, you know why God allowed this to happen?” And he told me, he said, “At the time Cody,” he said, “it frustrated me.” And he said, “but her response changed my life.” And she told him she said, “You know, Dave, God did not do this to you, but he allowed it to happen because he could trust you with the scars.” And that statement changed his entire life. And, I kind of look at my life in the same way and I don’t believe God did this to me, I believe we live in a world where things just happen. We, as human beings, we have free will, things will occur whether I’m a Christian or not a Christian. However, the benefit of being a Christian is I have Jesus to cling to. And so I use this story as a way to minister to others, and display my scars. And I love using the parallel between the physical scars and the emotional scars because many people in today’s world have those and those are often the most difficult to recover from.

[BILLY]:
Hmm, yeah. And, I work with a lot of people with emotional scars, and I stole a quote, I believe it was from Nadia Bolz-Weber, that when we share our story, we do have to share out of the scar and not the open wound. It does have to heal and it takes time to do that. And it, I was gonna ask you if you got the answer to your why, and you did give us that. I have so many people that do ask why. Why did this happen? Why did that happen? And that’s the biggest struggle that they deal with. I love a quote by Viktor Frankl that says, “those who have a why to live can bear with almost any how,” and it’s like why keep going? Why keep moving forward? And so, what propelled you to continue moving forward and not leave your faith upbringing behind?

[CODY]:
Yeah, I think having that strong foundation set in place at a young age made a huge difference, the support system that I had. However, in my mindset, I understand that life is short, more so now than ever. And, life is not about me specifically. We are here on this earth to make an impact on others. We are gifted with time, with our very heartbeat is a gift. And so I look at, you know, I always had a vision to help people. Like I said, I felt called to ministry as a little boy going to that kid’s camp, that my vision grew through the years. And, you know, granted, I was speaking to mostly children at the time, but since this experience has occurred, the audience has grown and the reach that I have is more significant. And so, I’m at a stage now like I’ve seen, I see all this, and I recognize that I’m not alone. There’s many other individuals. There was children up in the, you know, it was Riley’s Children’s Hospital, you know, children that have encountered burns, you know, burn injuries. There’s a lot of people that are going through tragedies and difficulties. And I look at my life and I look at what is truly the most important thing. Growing up, I always heard the statement: “Life is short, death is certain, but eternity is long.” And I try to stay focused on that eternity mindset. Granted, it’s hard some days, I certainly do have my struggles and my days where I get frustrated. Life is, it’s challenging at times. But, through it all, I keep picking myself back up because I know that, like I mentioned, my life is not for my own. I’m here to spread the message, encourage as many people as possible, help people get back up after being knocked down.

[BRANDY]:
Cody, in your book, I’m just gonna read a little bit, an excerpt from it. You say, “This pain I’m feeling, it’s like knives ripping through every layer of my flesh. I’m being skinned alive.” And it goes into a little bit more detail. You wake up after 20 days in a coma, and you’re in this immense pain, and you’ve got this story from that day until now, when a lot of people would have given up. And can you just kind of take us through those first days of waking up and what was going through your mind?

[CODY]:
Yeah. Just complete utter shock and devastation. Because, like I had mentioned, I don’t remember the wreck. And, surprisingly enough, the first responders said I was talking to them and everything. I told him who I was, where I worked. And, it’s one thing to share this story, you know, like what we’re doing here, but I encourage listeners to look at the images of some of the, what I went through. I mean, my, I was in a Dodge Durango and it was completely engulfed in flames. And so, it’s really remarkable to see all this. But, in the hospital, you know, I’m wrapped, my entire body is wrapped in bandages. I, you know, I’m laying, I have a neck and back brace on. And you know, I’m hearing all these doctors and nurses come in day in and day out. They’re washing me, they’re changing my wounds and I can’t even see what all they’re doing or what you know, has truly occurred to me. And granted, I was still highly medicated at the time. And so I was in the burn unit for a total of two and a half months. And then I went to a rehabilitation center, where I was constantly being monitored by nurses and doctors and therapists. I was there for six weeks, I had to relearn to walk and use my hands again, all the basics. But, you know, it really didn’t dawn on me what happened until maybe even a few weeks after the fact whenever I could fully see my scars, and that was tough.

[BRANDY]:
You have your study guide that goes through, like you’ve mentioned before, your physical scars, and then these emotional scars. I love this metaphor that you use. Unfortunately, you have both physical and mental scars. Can you kind of talk to me about both sides have that physical part and the mental part?

[CODY]:
Yeah, well, so I can tie in with my book being called ‘Scar Release’ on that. And, so as a burn survivor, I have contracture scars. And when a contracture scar occurs over the top of the joint, it can limit the mobility of that joint. And one of the ways they free up the scar to allow you to be mobile again, is they go in and they do a procedure called a scar release. And what that is, is they go in, they cut the scar at its root and they allow you to be mobile again. But a scar release does not remove the appearance of the scar, it allows the mobility to move with the scar. And so I use that in relation to the emotional scars and how many individuals in life, they have encountered scars, whether it be in their marriage, their business, it could be many different things. And if we’re not careful, these scars can keep us limited in our everyday lives. And so, like I had said, the emotional scar was the most challenging for me to recover from. It’s trying to gain that fresh mindset, renewing our mind so to speak, and refocusing and seeing that, reframing this situation in a whole new light. I hope that [inaudible]

[BILLY]:
Absolutely, absolutely. And I, as a counselor, I work with a lot of folks who’ve been through the pain of an auto accident and we spoke earlier, before we get on the podcast, about some of those fears in that PTSD you can carry after an accident and it can range from not wanting to step out the front door to just finding it highly uncomfortable, your level of anxiety through the roof when you climb in the driver’s seat or the passenger seat of a vehicle. Did you experience any of that? And if so, how did you heal from it?

[CODY]:
Yes, I did. And I will say that I think it’s beneficial in my case, that I don’t remember the wreck. However, I certainly do know of the aftermath and the effects that happened. And, I remember this day just like it was yesterday, and it was probably a few months out from what had happened to me and I was, you know, I had the choice of driving, you know, driving again, just back and forth to my therapy sessions whenever I got back home, because I had ongoing occupational physical therapy for even almost two years after this. So I knew that I needed to start driving and get back up and so I had that choice, because fear certainly wanted to grip me, and I remember sitting behind the steering wheel. And just thinking, “My goodness, the last time I was here, was whenever my life changed drastically. Do I dare get in the driver’s seat again?” And, you know, fear in that moment wants to grip you in fear will keep you limited if you allow it. But I had to come to reality that, you know, I don’t want to live in fear. And it’s making that choice and, you know, just like I mentioned, reframing the entire situation. I’m not going to allow fear to control me for the rest of my life so I have to move forward. And just because it happened to me one time doesn’t mean it’s going to happen to me again. You have to start telling yourself these things, you know these things to see the situation differently.

[BILLY]:
Wow, thank you so much for going into the details of your story and your pain. Let’s talk about your life today. How has it changed? What do you do? How’s this shape the way you see the world?

[CODY]:
It’s definitely changed a lot for me as a young man. Today, I’m 30 years old and I’ve seen a lot of things happen just since this experience. And it’s been remarkable, because you know, I wrote the book, and I’ve been able to travel and speak to a lot of people. Spoken in correctional facilities, I’ve spoken to burn survivors, young adults. It’s been amazing. And so, where I’m at now I would, you know, people say, “Would you change what happened to you?’ And I, no, I wouldn’t, because it’s taught me so much about life. And the lessons that I learned through this experience, they are very valuable. And granted, I’m not perfect, I’m still learning and still growing on the daily. God is guiding me and helping me and continuing to reveal things to me. But, you know, I have seen this to totally transform my entire life and my vision that I had as a little boy of impacting people it has really just been enhanced all the more because of the scars that I carry. And so I speak all over the place, although right now due to, you know, the COVID pandemic, everything is virtual, a lot of podcasts, and then I’m just planning away for 2021. You know, I want to keep things moving and continue to, you know, make an impact.

[BILLY]:
Oh, that’s beautiful. Well, one question, do you still get to juggle?

[CODY]:
I do. And I’m glad you brought that up. So, before all this, you know, my juggling talents… I don’t want to sound boastful in this, but I had done…

[BILLY]:
I’ve seen some YouTube videos.

[BRANDY]:
Go ahead and boast.

[BILLY]:
You could, that was pretty amazing.

[CODY]:
Oh, thank you. So, I thoroughly enjoy what I did. I mean, to me, I didn’t even need an audience. There was when I would, because I worked at the church at the time, and I need high ceilings to be able to do some of the stuff I did. And I would just go in there, I’d turn on music and I’d be in my happy place. So I always loved, I love juggling and it was always a fun way to break the ice and even do visual [inaudible]. And so, whenever this happened to me, my hands were severely burned. And the doctors came in and they told my family, they said, “Listen, we’re going to have to amputate a few of Cody’s fingers.” And my family remembers, and my mom, she stepped in and she said, “No, you can’t, he juggles.” And, oh, you could imagine the surgeon’s face. They’re probably like, “You’re kidding me. He juggles?” But they were able to save ’em but my fingers don’t have the mobility that they used to. But I have adapted. And so today, you know, I can juggle, I used to juggle seven balls, I did… I can do six. And then I, you know what, I do clubs and I’ve juggled fire since all this has happened again. And so, it’s been, I’m really, it’s amazing to see it, that you know, granted, there’s some tricks I can’t do, but I make the most of what I can do.

[BILLY]:
Oh, I love it. I love it. So, in persevering and pushing forward and you mentioned the future. What’s the future look like for Cody Byrns? What’s on the agenda for you?

[CODY]:
Well, that is something I’m still continuing to pray and seek God’s guidance on, but I do know that it’s gonna continue to encourage people, uplift people as much as I can. You know, we live in a day and age where people are just really needing some encouragement and some guidance and I know that that will continue to be the case, years to come. And so, yeah, I’ll continue to speak as much as I can. I know the college market is going to be, I’d already booked some events for speaking at universities for next year, corporate events, finding new audiences, new ways to get the message out there.

[BILLY]:
Wow, thank you for sharing your story. So, through all this, what would you say is the hardest lesson you’ve had to learn?

[CODY]:
Patience is something I’m still learning. But, you know, with this, it wasn’t a quick turnaround for me, and that, you know, from that understanding came depression. I did battle with depression going through this experience, because the results didn’t come quickly. And so, the understanding that patience and knowing that everything will happen in time. And that’s, like I said, that’s something I’m still learning and growing. And so, I always tell people, the four steps that I encourage because no matter what you’re going through in life, hopefully this can be a powerful takeaway for you. And it’s “EPIC”, and that’s an acronym. And so, the E is, it stands for “embrace challenges,” the P is “provide perspective,” the I is “implement change,” and the C is “celebrate and serve.” And so I continue to focus on those four steps throughout my every day. But I think those are some powerful takeaways that I continue to use on the daily.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. And so, through the emotional pain, the physical pain, the low days, the depression, what inspires you to keep going at this point?

[CODY]:
At this point, I would say, at the root of it all, it’s my faith in Jesus Christ, and the people of this world and how much they need hope. And that remains my why.

[BILLY]:
Cody, thank you so much for sharing your story with us, for sharing your pain, your trauma, your tragedy, and your hope. And that’s where it’s at. And we can’t wait to see more of you and hear more of you out there as you get to get out into the universities and share with people. You know, how you overcome tragedy, and when life hands you one thing when you think you’re going to get another, how do you wake up and move forward and put one foot in front of the other and you’ve literally had to do that. So thank you for taking this and sharing it with the world and our listeners. Cody, you have a wonderful day. Thank you so much for being with us.

[CODY]:
Well thank you so much for having me, it’s been an honor.

[BILLY]:
Yes.

[BRANDY]:
Thanks Cody.

[BILLY]:
Are you ready to find freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find your strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your own skin, and be the most authentic beta male, then our free Beta Male Revolution Course is for you. Sign up for free at betamalerevolution.com/course. This podcast is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regards to the subject matter covered. This is given with the understanding that neither the host, Practice of the Practice, or the guest are providing legal, mental health, or other professional information. If you need a professional you should find one.

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