Marine, Veteran, and Healer Eric Strom | Episode 41

Are you familiar with trauma, as a definition or as an experience? How can unresolved traumas block you from forming deeper and more fulfilling relationships? How can partners support one another through an emotional shift?

In this podcast episode, Billy and Brandy Eldridge speak with Eric Strom about trauma and healing.

Meet Eric Strom

Eric has a focus on trauma, anxiety, depression, and an interest in helping men be more present, available, and attuned to their emotions and their partners. Eric is trained in Brainspotting and EMDR and has an interest in all body-focused treatments. Eric is a Board-Certified Diplomate with the American Board of Examiners in Clinical Social Work. Eric is a veteran of the military having served in both the Marine Corps as an enlisted Marine and the MN Army National Guard as a Behavioral Health Officer.

When not engaged in providing therapy, recording, and editing the Mental Health Solutions Podcast, Eric enjoys being outside, spending time with his two kids, and working on his private pilot’s license.

Visit his website and connect on Facebook and LinkedIn. Listen to his podcast here.

Sign up here for the free e-course for empowering healthy male emotions.

In This Podcast

Summary

  • Defining trauma
  • Why do people need to address trauma?

Defining trauma

Most people consider trauma as the “big T”. These are traumas that come from car accidents, sexual assault, combat trauma and they manifest in isolation, sleeplessness, and so forth. These are important to identify and address in order to maintain peace in your life.

Although there is also the “little T” trauma that most people are not aware of, they are no less important and necessary to work through. These could be things such as childhood abuse and difficult childhood experiences because these, when unresolved, can still trigger people right through their adulthood.

Why do people need to address trauma?

Putting aside and ignoring trauma was a pattern of past generations, but living with unresolved generational trauma can inhibit you from fully flourishing and succeeding in your life.

If you’re not connecting with people because as a kid you were taught, maybe not explicitly but through the actions of others, that talking about your emotions and feelings and expressing those things is not a safe place then why in the world are you going to find that to be a safe place as an adult? (Eric Strom)

By not addressing trauma, they can manifest themselves in your relationships and inhibit you from forming truer, deeper bonds with people out of a fear of the trauma you experienced.

Are you ready to find the freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your skin and be the most authentic beta male, then our free beta revolution course is for you. Sign up for free.

Useful links:

Meet Billy Eldridge

billy-eldridge

Meet Billy, the resident beta male. For Billy, this is a place to hang out with other beta males and the people who love them. We’re redefining what beta males look like in the world. I have learned to embrace my best beta self, and I can help you to do the same. As a therapist, I understand the need to belong. You belong here. Join the REVOLUTION.

 

Meet Brandy Eldridge

brandy-eldridge

Hello, Beta friends. I am an alpha personality who is embracing the beta way of life. I feel alive when connected with people, whether that is listening to their stories or learning about their passions. Forget small talk, let’s go deep together. Come to the table and let’s have some life-changing conversations.

 

Thanks for listening!

Did you enjoy this podcast? Feel free to leave a comment below or share this podcast on social media! You can also leave a review of the Beta Male Revolution Podcast on iTunes and subscribe!

Podcast Transcription

[BILLY]:
Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a family of podcasts seeking to change the world. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

Hey, Beta Male Revolution. Today on the podcast, Brandy and I had the privilege of interviewing Eric Strong from Mental Health Solutions. Eric is a veteran of our military, he’s a Marine, but he’s also a guy that helps men become more present, emotionally available and attuned to their emotions and their partners.

[BRANDY]:
Which is what the Beta Male Revolution is all about, right?

[BILLY]:
Absolutely. And who would have thought I would have gotten a Marine who identifies with Beta Male Revolution. Eric was just so open and honest with us and how he’s got along his own journey of healing. And now he helps other people heal, especially veterans, so take time to listen. Remember my day job. I work for Olive Tree Counseling, a business my friend Randy Thomas and I own. You can go to olivetreetxk.com if you’re in need of counseling services, Randy and I also do some consulting so you can always reach out to us and the betamalerevolution.com website. So if you haven’t rated and reviewed the podcast, hop on over on your favorite app and rate review, it helps us out a little bit. Join us with Eric Strong.

[BILLY]:
Good morning, Beta Male Revolution. I think it’s morning. Is it morning?

[BRANDY]:
It’s morning.

[BILLY]:
It’s morning. [Unclear] morning where you’re listening.

[BRANDY]:
Hey Eric.

[BILLY]:
What’s going on?

[ERIC]:
Hey guys. How are you?

[BRANDY]:
We’re good. So we were talking just a little bit before this, so our listeners know, we were talking just a little bit before this and probably talked way too long. But I found out that Eric is from very close where my father is from, in Minnesota. So my dad is from a little town called Lismore, Minnesota. So shout out to all my people up the north in the cold weather.

[BILLY]:
All 20 people [unclear].

[BRANDY]:
Yeah. And you’re from around there, and that’s crazy because you knew Lismore, and no one’s ever heard of Lismore, Minnesota.

[BILLY]:
I don’t know if there’s any beta males in Lismore, Minnesota. How’s the beta ratio out there?

[BRANDY]:
They’re still Vikings.

[ERIC]:
Right, right. Yeah, yeah. So I’m from, I grew up just south of Marshall, Minnesota, which isn’t terribly far from Worthington, which is kind of the next you know, like the big city, like you’re saying, Brandy, for those folks in Lismore. Yeah, you know, I certainly, I’ve heard of Lismore, like that rings a bell. Right. I mean, I couldn’t point to it on a map. But yeah. That’s pretty wild.

[BRANDY]:
It’s not on a map. Don’t worry about it.

[ERIC]:
It’s a secret, not even on a map.

[BRANDY]:
Now you’re in St. Paul, Minneapolis area, and Minnetonka. Is that correct?

[ERIC]:
Yep. So I live in Minneapolis, and have for the time being, have office location in Minnetonka, Minnesota for actually, in this time of COVID, transitioning out of that office space and primarily working from home, you know, because everybody I see is through telehealth again in this time of COVID. It’s why we’re recording this in November, and I don’t know about in Texas, but in Minnesota, cases are on the rise again. And so seeing folks in person is just not on the cards right now.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, yeah, we’re going through the same thing over here. So it’s been a wild year and you know, we’ll see where it goes. So you are a social worker.

[BRANDY]:
A licensed social worker.

[BILLY]:
Not just one in name only, you really are licensed, right?

[ERIC]:
Yes, yes. I have all the letters.

[BILLY]:
So my favorite question to ask people who are in the mental health field, what led you there? And how in the world did you get into it?

[ERIC]:
Oh, my gosh. Uh, so, you know, it’s an interesting story, you know, growing up, certainly, we did not talk about emotions in my family. We still really don’t. But being a therapist wasn’t even something that was on my radar. That wasn’t even something I’d ever even thought of. I knew from a very young age that I wanted to be in the military. My dad was in the army in Vietnam, then was in the Minnesota Army National Guard. And so growing up I always knew I wanted to be in the military and I don’t even know if I knew what a therapist was. And so I did go the military route. I spent five years active duty in the Marine Corps, left that, I met my ex wife during that time, and her mom was going to school to be a therapist. So after my enlistment was done, came home, didn’t really know what I wanted to do when I grew up. I was talking to her and thought, you know, that sounds pretty okay, I’ll give that a shot.

I started taking some classes at a local community college and quickly realized that if I was gonna do this, I needed to go full time, or this was gonna take me forever. So I started full time, as a full time student at the age of 26, at the University of St. Thomas, in St. Paul, Minnesota, and quickly realized there that what you can do with a bachelor’s in social work was nothing that I was interested in. But had a wonderful mentor, Dr. Randy Herman, who was in the social work program, who was a Vietnam vet as well, had been a social worker in the army. And he and I talked a lot and realized that, you know, moving on to the master’s program, and being able to do individual counseling was something that I thought I might like to do.

So I continued on that path, went through their accelerated MSW program and did my internship at Regions Hospital in St. Paul, which was not my first choice. I was naively or, I guess, I don’t know what, arrogantly thinking that, you know, I’m a male veteran social worker, I’ll be a shoo-in at the VA. Well, that was not the case. And I was very disappointed to not get that placement. But, you know, it certainly afforded me other opportunities and learning experiences. And, yeah, I moved on from that, actually couldn’t find a, I graduated in 2009, and couldn’t find a clinical job that I wanted initially. So actually worked in higher education for a couple years and actually considered giving up my license, you know, I was an under licensed graduate social worker at that time, so not an independent, didn’t have my independent licensure and actually considered giving it up because I really enjoyed what I was doing in higher ed, but a job opportunity presented itself and so I took that, and then it was off to the races with my therapy career.

[BRANDY]:
Well, Eric, first of all, thank you for your service. Second, Semper Fi. My brother is a major in the Marines. And so when we were discussing you before you came on, I was really excited for this episode, because I think this is just a multifaceted conversation that we get to have when we talk about not only the military and the needs that they have for therapists and social workers. But being one yourself, that just adds a layer of I don’t know, vulnerability to it, which I think makes the best therapist. I mean, I look at my husband, who obviously has been on the other side of the chair, he’s been on the couch, when he went through rehab with drugs and alcohol. I believe when he speaks to people, it opens them up, because they can say like, he doesn’t have his whole life together, right? Like he’s lived this. He’s not just speaking from a textbook. And so when you talk about the services that you do now, and you mentioned, like a mentorship, that just goes right back to that marine belief in like brotherhood, and I would imagine when they see you, their walls may come down a little easier than they see someone who’s in a pair of shorts and flip flops, and is like, so tell me about your mother. You know, that…

[ERIC]:
I mean, I might be that, but just in a different kind of way.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. Who are you referring to in shorts and flip flops and asking the question, is that me? Was directed at me, Brandy?

[BRANDY]:
But you just go to the trauma, and you can do that. And so for our listeners, I would love for you to talk about that. Let’s talk about trauma. What is trauma? What is big T, little T? Not everyone that listens understands this, and making a very long intro to this, I also had a friend text me this week and she said, I love listening to your podcast because it’s free therapy. And I was thinking, yeah, it’s free therapy for you but it’s also a place for me to work out my stuff, too. And not everybody knows all the acronyms that social workers, therapists use. So can you speak to trauma specifically for our listeners and tell them what it is?

[ERIC]:
Sure, sure. So oftentimes, when people think about trauma, they might think about those big T traumas, you know, a car accident, you know, sexual assault, combat trauma, you know, things along that nature. Those are very traumatic events, and things that absolutely have an impact on people, right, you know, cause them to have that anxiety, that sleeplessness, that exaggerated startle response, you know, perhaps isolation, you know, whatever it might be in terms of that. And so those are really important to identify, to address, to look at. And then there’s the little T traumas that I think people are less attuned to, but are equally and in some ways, even more important, and those are the things that are these more persistent incidents that happen, you know, whether it be on a daily basis, or weekly basis.

It could be things like, you know, I work with a lot of people who have a history of either childhood sexual abuse, or, you know, just really difficult childhood experiences. And so we talk about things like, you know, when, when you were a kid, were you seen, were you heard? Did people, you know, talk to you about how you were doing? Or was it something that you were, you know, kind of pushed to the side that, you know, if you expressed emotions, people maybe, you know, said, well, don’t cry, or I’ll give you something to cry about, right? I mean, that can be a trauma to somebody, it can be something where, you know, bullying, right, can be a traumatic event, thinking about in terms of, you know, we as parents, and I don’t fault the parents of the folks that I see, right, I mean, they very likely had their own stuff going on, their own traumas, but looking at it, you know, some of these small T things like people, you know, just ignoring kids. They maybe don’t see it as ignoring, but, you know, somebody comes home from a hard day at work, and, you know, the child wants to engage, wants to play, and the parent is just, you know, exhausted and kind of doesn’t engage, isn’t attuned to them, right? That can be one of those, you know, small T traumas, as it’s repetitive over time, and it builds this, this sense of either unworthiness or this sense of, well, you know, my emotions aren’t important.

Things like that can be really impactful. And you know, so those are some, some small examples of, or just a few examples of some of those small T traumas as it relates to, you know, kind of childhood stuff, which is a lot of what I see and a lot of what I work with.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, well, thank you for giving a voice to the small T because I mean, that was my biggest thing growing up was [unclear] panic attacks, I had a lot of anxiety that wasn’t validated in me. But it wasn’t what I consider to be trauma as a therapist, and should I even talk about it, should I even deal with it, does it even deserve space in the room because I didn’t go through all these other things? But I quickly learned I did go through this and I do need to work on it. And as a beta guy, that’s a little more in touch with my feelings, I wanted to. On the other side, like with the alphas I see sometimes it’s like, the question I get is, that was the past, why do I need to deal with this shit? I mean, bro, that was then, this is now, I don’t want to talk about it, I want to move on. Why do people even need to address trauma? Or do they? If they’re like, I got a job, I got a family, I mow my yard on the weekends. Why do I need to talk about this with somebody?

[ERIC]:
Yeah, so I certainly have gotten that question before, you know, like, why are we even looking at this? That was in the past. That’s just how things were back then and all that and yeah, you know, that, that maybe is how things were, you know, for your parents generation, or for, you know, how things were growing up. It’s about let’s take a look at how that’s impacting you now. Let’s take a look at, you know, some of these deeper down parts of how you are interacting with your kids, with your spouse, with your friends. How many true, meaningful relationships do you have? You know, and like, oh, I got a lot of friends, like, yeah, okay, got a lot of friends. But how many of those friends can you truly connect with on a deeper level? How many of them do you feel comfortable with or do you feel have that emotional vulnerability to connect with? Because what’s there if you aren’t, like, what’s that barrier? It’s that fear of rejection. Right?

So if you’re not connecting with people, because as a kid you were taught, maybe, you know, not explicitly, but through the actions of others, that talking about your emotions, talking about your feelings, expressing those things, is not a safe place, then why in the world are you going to find that to be safe as an adult? So now we look at, you know, relationship issues, you know, partners being like, you know, and I speak primarily for the male identified client, because those are, you know, folks that I’m really kind of targeting more and more these days. But, you know, female partners, you know, or male partners, saying, you know, about their, you know, male identified partner, you know, he just won’t talk or our interactions, you know, are kind of transactional, or just feel very, you know, like, he’s not there, right? Yeah, yeah. And in a lot of ways he’s not there because that connecting on that deeper emotional level is scary, because who wants to be vulnerable, and reach out to the person that you care for the most, only to then be rejected?

And that’s where a lot of this for a lot of these struggles come from. And that’s what I tell a lot of, you know, a lot of the folks that I work with, to start to kind of bring them into the fold, to help them understand like, hey, man, look, you can keep going about life the way it is. Yeah. Like, go to work, come home, you know, drink a beer, mow the yard. Yeah, life will be fine. But how fulfilled are you really? How exciting is his life as a whole if that’s just kind of where you are all the time?

[BILLY]:
Yeah, that’s very exciting to me. I know, it’s exactly, Brandy being the resident alpha, she’s like, feelings, why do we need to talk about those? But I love how you speak to it gets in the way of connection. And that trauma can isolate a human being and block true friendships and relationships. I remember when I was in the depths of alcoholism and addiction, the prominent theme in my life was isolation, and all of that pain and all of that unresolved, undealt with stuff, even though there were people in and out of my life, I was very alone, and no one truly knew me.

[BRANDY]:
I want to ask because I’m not the therapist in the room. So I want to just ask maybe some general questions and I really do not like stereotyping but I am going to ask just in generalities. Speaking to two men, is that not a characteristic we see in men, that they just can check out? Is that, again, I don’t want to stereotype but like my husband, right here, I’m gonna throw you under the bus for a minute, in a very loving way.

[BILLY]:
There we are. It’s a comfortable place for me.

[BRANDY]:
I’m not gonna run you over, I’m just gonna throw you under there and let you work for a little while but then I’ll let you come out.

[BILLY]:
I’ve got a pallet under there, it’s okay.

[BRANDY]:
No, but for Billy, and I know his job is like yours, you emotionally give and listen all day long. And so when he comes home, he doesn’t really want to, he needs time to check out, respect that, honor that, understand that. But even when he hasn’t been at work, like sometimes his favorite thing to do is just check out, and I’m okay with people who are introverted and need alone time, I very much need my alone time. But is that just a characteristic of men in general? And then my second question is, for the women listening that have partners like that, or whoever they are thinking of when they’re listening to this podcast, what are some practical things we can do? How can we approach that in a way that our partners hear us?

[ERIC]:
So I think in terms of the, the kind of, you know, maybe not shutting down, but just kind of, you know, checking out for a bit of time, I do think that from time to time, we all do that, right? We all kind of need that space to just kind of be in our own world for a little bit, right? Are men more predisposed to that than women? I think that societally men are more predisposed, more encouraged in a way to do that. Because, again, it comes back to this emotional expression, right? If this isn’t something that you’re comfortable with, or something that you’re used to, then it’s easier, more comfortable to compartmentalize and I can speak to that from personal experience. You know, I often tell my, my clients, I’m like, I haven’t been a therapist forever, right? Like, and I haven’t been the healthiest therapist forever. And I, you know, I’ll openly admit that, I’ve had my own, you know, relational struggles and things like that in the past and done my own work around that and compartmentalizing, kind of checking out, was the easiest way to to deal with that, to kind of separate those those worlds. So, Billy, I’d be curious to hear your thoughts on that.

[BILLY]:
No, I mean, you know, I tend to check out. I was thinking of a quote by Carl Jung, that sometimes he has to, I’m gonna paraphrase. Sometimes he has to retreat into a more isolated state to recover just from the futility of words and chatter and noise. And I think we do need to have time where we unplug, and we kind of go inward. And it depends on where it’s coming from. Is it coming from a place of health or unhealth? And, yeah, are we withdrawing and cutting off because we don’t want to deal with the world? Or are we just recharging?

[BRANDY]:
So what do I ask, what do I say, what do I do in a healthy way, instead of put your damn phone up and get off the couch and come color with the kids for a second? You know, that’s not, I say that, but that’s not always the right approach. So what do I do? And how do I approach him? And when it is just I need 20 minutes to just, you know, decompress? Or it’s, I don’t want to be around everybody right now, because I’m going through something and I don’t want to open up.

[BILLY]:
And when you say me, do you mean, like, generally, like generally, the world?

[BRANDY]:
I mean generally.

[ERIC]:
You know, I think just asking, right, you know, hey, I know this is something that, you know, has been a struggle or, hey, you know, I know you’re on your phone right now, I’d really like you to come down and interact with the kids, are things okay, like, I just noticed, you seem really distant. And be prepared for the, like, oh, yeah, yeah, it’s fine. It’s fine. I’m okay. You know, kind of response and, you know, and a lot of this is dependent upon the relational dynamics that exist within the couple, but also then kind of pushing back on that if it doesn’t seem okay. Like, it doesn’t feel okay. You know, it feels like you’re really disconnected from us right now. You know, what’s going on, really, you know, opening that space.

And then I have kind of an add on that goes into another piece of this, one thing that I’ve talked about. And we can talk about this later, too. But for a lot of men that I’ve talked to, as they have begun to kind of open that space, they have found their female partners are like, whoa, who is this guy being all like, open and sensitive and like, unprepared to deal with that. So I think, you know, that’s an important piece for, you know, for those female listeners with any partner, male partner, whatever, but to be prepared that if you’re gonna start asking these questions, and they’re gonna start doing the work, that there’s going to be that shift, and being open and supportive of that.

[BRANDY]:
So why do you deal with trauma? Like, what’s the purpose of it? You said, there’s a shift. I mean, when you address trauma, and you begin to work on it, and you say, there’s a shift, what does that look like? Is that good or bad? Should I be scared? Should I not ask the questions?

[ERIC]:
No, I think you absolutely ask the question. And, you know, what I mean, in terms of the shift is, so whether, you know, we’re dealing with big T, little T trauma, helping guys to begin to acknowledge and accept and identify their emotions, be moving into that more vulnerable space, you know, you might have somebody who has always just been that, like, rock solid, they are the foundation of the family, you know, they are there for everybody, everybody cries on their shoulder, and they don’t take an ounce from everybody else. And as you help them start to explore, like, look, man, you gotta, you know, you gotta have somebody too. You can’t, you know, always be taking on the burden of everybody else, without having somebody kind of, you know, filling your cup.

So, you know, I think it’s something where you just, then, you talk to them about, like, look, if, for the partner, expect that this is going to happen, that this person is going to start to be more vulnerable, that they’re going to, you know, maybe not be there all the time, not like, in a way that’s detrimental to the family, or whatever. But they might say, like, you know, I’m just feeling really kind of emotionally tapped out today. You know, I hear that you’re struggling as well, let’s look at this together, let’s address this in kind of a different way, whatever it might be. So, what I mean, in terms of being prepared for that shift is just knowing that there may be an emotional, not in a bad way, but an emotional difference, that they start to see, you know, that that person in their life will start to show up differently.

[BILLY]:
Thank you so much for explaining that in words I wish I had. That wraps it up so clearly. So Eric, I gotta ask you and shifting a little bit to a different topic. You’re a former military guy, I guess you always are once you go through that process. Why would you want to come on a podcast called Beta Male Revolution? And where on the spectrum of this alpha beta dichotomy, where do you fall?

[ERIC]:
Yeah, you know, so, I came across your podcast, and I was like, man, this is really good. I really enjoy this. And I was enjoying, you know, what you’re saying, and, you know, it’s interesting, right, we often think of the military, you know, being full of, you know, quote, unquote, alphas. I know Brandy doesn’t like the alpha labels, or any of the labels. You know, but yeah, I mean, that’s often what we think about right? And so, for me, and we were talking about this before we started recording, but, you know, I think I used to be a lot more of a beta than what I am now. And I say that because I think as I was able to address my own shame, and my own, you know, issues, relational issues, things like that, that I had, I’ve begun to shift into this place of more clarity, and drive, and, you know, moving more up to that kind of, you know, B plus, A minus, you know, kind of place on on the spectrum in terms of the alpha male. I would never categorize myself as a full on alpha, but certainly see a lot of those folks in the military. And so, oftentimes, you know, working with those individuals in terms of mental health because I, you know, you mentioned I was in the military, spent five years in the Marine Corps, and I’m still in the military now as a behavioral health officer for the Minnesota Army National Guard. So certainly there’s a lot of folks that I work with who are on that, you know, very much that alpha kind of place. So I have to navigate how to get them to open up and talk about what’s going on, for them. And, you know, having my own experiences has certainly been helpful in that. And having been around for a while too, certainly helps.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, absolutely. And I think, for the longest time, like you said, you know, there were generations where we didn’t deal with mental health issues. Whether you were back here, me as a kid that just had panic attacks and that was like, being scared all the time isn’t a very what we would consider masculine emotion. But I had something clinically going on, but it manifested in a way that somehow came off as unmanly and put me in a category. And so we didn’t talk about that. And then we have people in our military, which I’m very grateful for but when you go off, and you experience combat, and you see things and you experience things, sometimes you just can’t come back home and hit the ground running like nothing happened. There is a process of dealing with and processing and unfolding, and I’m so grateful for the opportunity that I’ve been given to sit with some wonderful men who have been through that, and women, as they unpack that part of their journey. And I’m so grateful for you that you’re able to do that with the experience of being in that same situation combined.

[ERIC]:
Yeah, I mean, certainly having that experience is helpful. And it really is a gift to be able to sit with folks who’ve been through that now, having been through a little bit more of an intense deployment in some ways. Myself, I mean, it certainly allows me to sit with folks in a different way, as well. And yeah, it really is a gift and an honor for me to sit with them. And, you know, with veterans, for sure. And with all my clients. There’s definitely still days where that imposter syndrome sneaks in and it’s like, why are these people coming to talk to me? But yeah, it truly is a gift to be able to sit with these folks.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. And it’s so good to hear you say that, as a guy who is in our military and served in our military, and to hear you say, I deal with imposter syndrome, too.

[ERIC]:
Yeah, man.

[BILLY]:
It’s very freeing. You mentioned it’s a gift to sit with the people that we sit with, and mentioning gifts, I believe you have a gift for our audience.

[ERIC]:
I do indeed.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. Tell us about that.

[ERIC]:
That was a good segue.

[BRANDY]:
That was such a good segue. I was giving him a thumbs up [unclear].

[BILLY]:
I’m pretty proud of that one.

[ERIC]:
[Unclear]. Yes, yeah, I do. So I have a free nine part email course. It’s the Healing Men series, is a nine part email course that’s designed to help men begin to explore their emotions. It starts with, you know, setting a commitment to yourself, of exploring the emotional pain and challenges that you’ve had in your life. It explores how societally we’ve been set up to live in this constrained emotional box. And really haven’t been afforded the opportunity to openly express our emotions in so many ways. You know, it really challenges beliefs and misconceptions, allows us to explore our hurt and pain, crack open those wounds, you know, begin to move into a good healing and growing space and, you know, promote self care throughout the, the process and, yeah, it’s just a really, you know, really great start for folks who want to begin that journey. And so, you know, you can find that at mhsclinics.com/course, and sign up, check it out, and hopefully, you know, use that as a tool to begin to move down a healthier path. I encourage people to use it as, you know, individually is great, and also as an adjunct to their own individual or group therapy.

[BILLY]:
Absolutely. We’ll link to that in our show notes so people can hop over to betamalerevolution.com and go to your episode and hop right into your ecourse. So in closing, we have two questions for you. Mine’s pretty serious, Brandy’s is very serious. I’ll start with my question. Up until this point in your life, what’s the hardest lesson you’ve had to learn?

[ERIC]:
Oh, man. I think the hardest lesson I’ve had to learn really has been addressing my own struggles, and that’s even weird to say out loud, because I’ve often been somebody who like, yeah, I’m good. Like, I don’t really have, you know, I had a pretty good childhood. I don’t have, you know, any real trauma, things like that. But as I’ve explored things more like I do recognize that I’ve had some of my own mental health struggles and that was definitely a hard lesson too, to learn and accept, and work through.

[BRANDY]:
Okay, so I want to know the song, what is your jam when you’re in the car, by yourself, singing at the top of your lungs? What is it?

[BILLY]:
That’s [unclear] question.

[ERIC]:
Yeah. Well, it depends on the day, but I’ll tell you, maybe embarrassingly, so um, there’ll be people in my life who find this pretty amusing. So I’m getting my private pilot’s certificate right now. And I’ve always…

[BRANDY]:
Wait, wait. Tell me, is it the Top Gun soundtrack?

[ERIC]:
Yes.

[BRANDY]:
No, did I really guess it?

[ERIC]:
You did, yeah. And there’s a lot more to that, like, as a kid, like, I wanted to be a pilot, like a naval aviator, so bad, but I glasses so I couldn’t. Yeah. And, yeah, so for whatever reason, that was the first thing that came to mind when you asked that, so like, alright, well, we’ll just go with that.

[BRANDY]:
Take me to the danger zone.

[BILLY]:
Highway to the danger zone.

[BRANDY]:
That’s it. That’s a great soundtrack. That actually is, listen, a piece of advice from me, unsolicited advice to both of you, maybe you should start your therapy sessions out with what’s your jam? Because look at how much insight we got from that one question. And I think it’s a great question, because oftentimes, people will answer it and they’ll give like, what’s a cool song? And then if they’re not really honest at the beginning, I’ll follow it up with okay, now, what’s the real song? Because, you know, I want to give like, I’m listening to like, you know, Mumford and Sons or some obscure band and make it look like I’m really cool. But honestly, it’s Mariah Carey’s, like, Fantasy, you know, because that’s what I’m like, belting out, or Celine Dion. But I don’t want to tell people that. So, I love that you’re getting your pilot’s license. I love that you’re making a way for a dream that was yours since you were a little kid and that you were honest enough to tell us about the Top Gun soundtrack. It’s classic. It is timeless.

[BILLY]:
Thank you so much for being on today here. And we can’t wait to talk more with you in the future.

[ERIC]:
All right. Thanks to both of you. Appreciate it.

[BILLY]:
Are you ready to find freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find your strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your own skin and be the most authentic beta male, then our free Beta Male Revolution course is for you. Sign up for free at betamalerevolution.com/course.

This podcast is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. This is given with the understanding that neither the host, Practice of the Practice, or the guest are providing legal, mental health, or other professional information. If you need a professional, you should find one.

Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a network of podcasts seeking to help you thrive, imperfectly. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom Podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

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