Laura Long is a Bad Ass Therapist | Episode 22

Laura Long is a Bad Ass Therapist | Episode 22

How did Laura come to be a badass therapist? What are some noticeable patterns between betas and alphas? Why is it so difficult for guys to be more emotionally in tune?

In this podcast episode, Billy and Brandy Eldridge speak with Laura Long about her therapy journey as the badass therapist.

Meet Laura Long

Laura Long is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and the owner of YourBadAssTherapyPractice.com, where she helps ambitious, Type-A therapists push through their fears and unleash their inner badass in private practice.

Laura offers free practice-building tools through her email list and her brand new Youtube channel. Her signature 8-week online course has successfully graduated over 200 therapists, and she also runs small mastermind groups and a private online community reserved for her students.

Laura is best known for her off-the-cuff coaching style that includes colorful language, a witty sense of humor, and an uncanny ability to keep it real. Her unique approach to marketing and customer service challenges the status quo and helps therapists to become better business owners. She shows therapists how to grow and scale their practices without losing their minds – because building your private practice should be fun!

You can read Laura’s blog at www.YourBadAssTherapyPractice.com and follow her antics at www.Facebook.com/YourBadAssTherapyPractice.

In This Podcast

Summary

  • From armchair therapy to building a brand
  • Couples and individuals
  • Patterns with betas and alphas

From armchair therapy to building a brand

Laura worked with taking chances and experimenting to see how things progressed. She helped people in her community along the way as a therapist; colleagues, friends, and loved ones and so began to realize that she could transfer all this knowledge onto one online space – a process that happened over time, step by step.

Through coaching group sessions and individual people, Laura was able to expand her practice and grow as a therapist.

Couples and individuals

Laura works with a solution-focused mindset and starting out working with couples. Here, with the solution-based work methods, she combined that with EFT therapy to work with families too.

In 2018, she experienced a shift in her therapy from wanting to work with couples to working with individuals. This niche burnout experience happens often with entrepreneurs where you think that you must pivot your business and your work methodologies, or run yourself into the ground.

Since this shift in 2018, Laura’s practice has been working mostly with entrepreneurs and assists them with business coaching.

Patterns with betas and alphas

There are plenty of men out there who need to embrace that – it’s not less masculine at all, in fact I think its actually more masculine to know what emotions you’re feeling and how to express your feelings to people. Not just to puff out your chest at any sign of discomfort.

Men are socialized and taught from a very young age ‘not to be a sissy’ and ‘to toughen up’, and that as soon as boys realize they have emotions they are taught to suppress them, and that leads to them growing up into men who are out of touch with their emotions and see them as weak. However, this is not the case. This emotionally suppressive behavior is modeled to boys at a young age, so they grow up internalizing these beliefs that is it emasculating to express emotions.

However, beta males are more in touch with their emotions. This does not mean they are any less masculine, they are men that can express how they feel which makes them easier to work with and be a partner to.

Beta males usually take themselves to therapy whereas alpha males are forced to go by spouses or their workplaces because they think that they do not need the assistance of therapy.

There can be symbiotic relationships between a beta and an alpha, and they balance one another out.

Are you ready to find the freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your skin and be the most authentic beta male, then our free beta revolution course is for you. Sign up for free.

Useful links:

Meet Billy Eldridge

billy-eldridge

Meet Billy, the resident beta male. For Billy, this is a place to hang out with other beta males and the people who love them. We’re redefining what beta males look like in the world. I have learned to embrace my best beta self, and I can help you to do the same. As a therapist, I understand the need to belong. You belong here. Join the REVOLUTION.

Meet Brandy Eldridge

brandy-eldridge

Hello, Beta friends. I am an alpha personality who is embracing the beta way of life. I feel alive when connected with people, whether that is listening to their stories or learning about their passions. Forget small talk, let’s go deep together. Come to the table and let’s have some life-changing conversations.

Thanks for listening!

Did you enjoy this podcast? Feel free to leave a comment below or share this podcast on social media! You can also leave a review of the Beta Male Revolution Podcast on iTunes and subscribe!

Podcast Transcription

[BILLY]:
Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a family of podcasts seeking to change the world. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

[BILLY]:
Hey, Beta Male Revolution. It’s Billy here, and I’ve got the lovely and talented Brandy Eldridge with me. And today we’re going to interview Laura Long.

[BRANDY]:
Laura Long.

[BILLY]:
We’re super excited. She is someone who has inspired us to do what we do. She’s helped me in my private practice over a probably thirty minute talk over coffee. She was able to kind of take apart things in me I had been mulling around for years and helped me begin to put them back together in a way that made sense, and so she has this talent to do things in the world that make her an awesome coach, therapist, and we can’t wait to talk to her. We also have our friend, Greg [unclear] here with us today, helping us out with technical stuff. He’s a friend of ours. He’s a friend of mine in recovery. He does this 24 hour a day thing with me. And that’s where we met, and we’ve gotten to be good friends. So we just wanted to give a shout out to Greg who’s sitting in with us today.

[BRANDY]:
He’s going off to Full Sail University. That’s a really cool school for entertainment, media. Hopefully he’ll be making movies.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, we can’t wait to see what you do in the world, Greg. Thanks for hanging out with us.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah. And he’s our biggest fan. And when I say biggest fan, I will say he’s our only fan. And so we brought him to the upper room.

[BILLY]:
He’s in the upper room with us today. It’s our new little podcast studio we have. But, hey.

[BRANDY]:
Hey, Laura.

[LAURA]:
Hi.

[BILLY]:
Laura, what’s up?

[LAURA]:
When you said he was your biggest fan, I was picturing like this six foot four, three hundred pound guy. I thought you were trying to be like, play on words.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. Yeah.

[BRANDY]:
He’s our biggest beta male fan.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. We’ll put a picture of him on there because he’s got really cool tattoos.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah. He’s not a beta male.

[BILLY]:
He’s… what are you, about five six? He’s about five six, like me.

[BRANDY]:
Jersey, baseball cap. He’s kinda alpha. Which is great because the other alphas that listen to this podcast just bust us on Facebook all the time.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, I got some quotes. Ooh, beta male revolution. Hahaha, who wants to join that? So I got all, I didn’t ask you but the water is nice, you can come on in if you want.

[BRANDY]:
But Laura, you are our people.

[LAURA]:
I am.

[BRANDY]:
I’m so excited just because it’s like a happy phone conversation to have with you. I look forward to your YouTube videos, your Facebook Lives, putting together shelves, whatever it is you’re doing. [Unclear].

[LAURA]:
Oh, yeah, my quarantunes. I haven’t done one of those in a little while.

[BRANDY]:
Quarantunes with wine.

[LAURA]:
Always. You know, something that struck me when I met you guys for the first time – and literally the only time actually, when I think about it. It’s kind of sad isn’t it, that we only met once – but I was really struck by all the dynamic. I mean, on the podcast, I think you both work really well together. But it’s easy for people to listen and be like, it’s just because they’re recording. But actually seeing the two of you work together in tandem on stuff, when we had that awesome conversation at Killin’It Camp, I was like, I like these people. I want to be friends with them. I want to move to Texarkana.

[BRANDY]:
Hey, hey, hey, don’t say that.

[BILLY]:
You’re welcome to come on, if you’d like.

[LAURA]:
You guys can renew your vows and I’ll be your maid of honor there and just come full circle.

[BILLY]:
Yes. Just come full circle.

[BRANDY]:
We do have that Southern thing in common though. You’re from the south, and we’re from the south, and so we deal with a lot of the same issues. But we want to kind of talk to you about how you got to be a badass therapist. The badass therapist.

[LAURA]:
I did in the beginning, the beginning is when most of the haters came through. And I think it gets to a certain point after a few years, where you’re still doing the same stuff and clearly you’re not changing, that I think the haters just realize that it’s just noise. I’m not going to change at this point just because one person says I’m a disgrace to the profession. I actually find it kind of funny now. I have a whole folder in my inbox called ‘entertainment’ for those, which is kind of fun to watch.

[BILLY]:
Because we talk about we live in the south, and you have Your BADASS Therapy Practice. Have you gotten any negative feedback on that business name?

[BRANDY]:
Is that [unclear]? Because I’d like to know what’s in that folder.

[LAURA]:
Yeah. Oh, yeah. Like, why do I have to use such foul language to get my point across? And then for every hate email I’ve gotten over the years, there’s twenty others that are people saying thank you for actually being clear with who you are.

[BRANDY]:
That’s what you do. So let me just clarify to our audience, that yes, you are a badass therapist. But another thing you do is you have your ecourses, you have… you help people get unstuck when they’re stuck, in kind of this way of just very quickly going to the root of stuff and finding out what it is people want to do, and how to get them from point A, to point B, to point C. How did you go from a therapist in the chair to this brand?

[LAURA]:
If I were to answer that question just straight up, it would sound as if this whole thing was planned out. Like, from the day I decided what to call my online business to today, it was all this like magical, orchestrated plan, and it really wasn’t. So I don’t want to sound like oh, well, I knew back in 2015 when I created this endeavor that I was going to do this, this and this and it was going to turn into that, because that is all total BS. A lot of it was just taking chances and seeing how it went and experimenting. And a lot of it’s worked out and some of it hasn’t. I mean, there have been certainly things and endeavors that I’ve thought about going into that didn’t work.

But yeah, so how did I go from therapist on the couch to Your Badass Therapy Practice? I mean, there’s the more logical answer of just helping people along the way as a therapist, helping colleagues, people in my community who I was friends with, who wanted to start private practice and then realizing that I can translate all of this into an online space. I thought that was really cool. And so I started that in just little small sections, like, I created my course. It was an email course. It was this very low key, low tech thing and the whole purpose was just to get the message out to as many therapists as I could, who wanted to start a private practice, that it could be done. And it’s only been after multiple iterations of that course, doing coaching, group and individual, doing masterminds. I think that’s how the brand over time has evolved.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. And so when we talk about being on the couch, in your individual one on one and family therapy practice, What framework do you come from? You’re a brief therapist, right?

[LAURA]:
Yeah. I’m solution-focused.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. I love that. I think a lot of people love that because it’s like, no frills, right? You don’t dig down twenty years ago; you get to the heart of the matter. Tell us about that.

[LAURA]:
Yeah. So actually, when I first started my private practice, I was mainly interested in doing couples work, and I was able to marry – no pun intended – I was able to marry solution-focused and a little bit more like the EFT, emotionally focused, and structural family therapy, with couples. So I did dive deep at times, talking about family of origin stuff and putting together patterns. But my end goal was to work myself out of a job as quickly as possible with couples, and I think that that really… the couples who came to see me really appreciate that because we were getting in, getting them what they needed, and then releasing them, kind of tossing them out of the nest if you will. And so I really did a lot more in depth work with couples in the beginning.

But what happened is that in 2018, I started feeling a shift internally, where I didn’t love working with couples as much anymore. I call it niche burnout. And I think a lot of therapists – and probably a lot of entrepreneurs in every industry – struggle with niche burnout at some point in their careers, and they have to kind of pivot, or they don’t pivot and they just run themselves into the ground, which we can certainly talk about that as well. And so when I started feeling this niche burnout with couples, I went back to the drawing board and I said, so what is it about these couples that I still love working with? And I realized it was there’s always one person in a couple, this alpha, is the person who is coming with the agenda for the session. It’s the person who has sometimes a lot of anxiety about the relationship, and the more vocal one, the one who in my situation working with couples tended to be the one who felt like they were moving things along in the relationship, and they had a lot of resentment or contempt towards their partner. And I found myself kind of gravitating towards that personality, no idea why. Surely, it’s not because I’m that. But that’s when I started seeing individuals more and that was back in 2018. So since then, my practice has moved, and evolved into… I still see some couples when I really feel like it’s a great fit, but for the most part, I work with entrepreneurs in the therapy context, and then I do business coaching with them too. [Unclear] practice.

[BRANDY]:
I want to go back to what you said that I thought was really cool. I was looking at Billy like, oh, we need to go deep with that. That was good.

[LAURA]:
Dive in.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah, you were talking about patterns that you see, and one of the patterns you saw was a couple coming in, and then there’s the one alpha. Have you ever… so I’m gonna ask you a couple questions. One, have you ever seen two betas or two alphas, just two passive personalities, and then two really strong personalities?

[LAURA]:
Absolutely. Yeah.

[BRANDY]:
And how do you work with them?

[LAURA]:
It’s hard, I’m going to be honest. So two betas together tend to not have the difficult conversations. They just – and I hate to generalize, it’s just, you know, you see it enough times, there’s tendencies. So the betas, they’re gonna be the ones that… they have what I call lumpy rug syndrome. Put it under the rug, or yeah, it’ll breeze over. Let’s not talk about that. I don’t want to ruffle feathers. So they are the couples who regardless of whether it’s male, female, two males, two females, it doesn’t matter. If you’re going to have one beta, two betas together, in my opinion, it doesn’t work out very well. They’re not having the difficult conversations that they need to be having.

Two alphas, I mean, I think we can speculate what that would look like. I would not want to end up with another alpha; that would be miserable for both of us. So I don’t see two alphas as often. What I do see is that naturally, there’s an alpha, naturally there’s a beta, but depending on how frustrated they are, how many times they’ve had the same recurring argument, the two might look like two alphas when they really aren’t. It’s just you have the beta who’s so fed up. I think Billy in a previous episode called it, it comes out sideways when he’s had it up to here. And then he’s going to explode. Your, Billy, your version of exploding might actually make Brandy laugh, but other betas, when they explode, it does kind of make them look like an alpha.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, yeah. And sometimes, you know, on that episode, we were kind of joking around a bit, but sometimes it can get real ugly and I can try to swell up and make myself bigger and more dominant, and that power struggle there when we get into that, it gets really unhealthy. So take us into that a little bit. We have some beta therapy questions, what patterns do you see for beta males? And what are the healthy parts versus the unhealthy parts? And this is a generalization, but I think people can pick up on things that they identify with and get rid of the rest, and take what you want.

[BRANDY]:
And then also alpha females, or vice versa. It doesn’t have to be female genders, just personalities in general, or share some of your patterns that you’ve seen.

[BILLY]:
I’m self-centered. I just want to know about me.

[LAURA]:
We all are, it’s fine. Something important to consider here is that the couples I work with are located in a state where I practice, and I practice in South Carolina. And what I was telling you guys before we started recording today is that I think I have a lot of closet beta males, where if they were to hear me on this podcast episode and think I was referring to them, they’d go, no, that’s not me. Like, what does she think she’s talking about? Like, I’m totally alpha. But just using y’all’s example, and your definition of what it means to be a beta male, at least a healthy one, I think that there’s plenty of men out there who need to embrace that. It’s not less masculine at all. I think it’s actually more masculine to know what your feelings are, to express your feelings to people, and not just to puff out your chest at any sign of discomfort.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. Why do you think it’s so difficult for… is it a cultural thing? Is it society for guys to get more emotionally in tuned and become more available and vulnerable? Why is that seen as less masculine?

[LAURA]:
I think men are taught at four years old T-ball practice, you know, don’t cry, don’t be a girl, don’t be a sissy, don’t be a wuss. They’re taught from the minute they can start to even understand or recognize that they have feelings that you need to stuff those suckers down. And then it, I think, is just reinforced in grade school, middle school. I mean, you name it. So I don’t think it’s something that is learned later in life. I think it’s learned very early on, even toddlers, you know, toddler boys, like, oh, don’t cry, you’re fine, wipe it off, rub some dirt in it. That’s how a lot of men I think are raised. And the culture itself just reinforces it, unfortunately.

[BRANDY]:
I feel like we should have had you on in the very first, when we first started doing Beta Male Revolution because we’ve had people say, I just don’t understand Beta Male Revolution. I don’t understand what a beta male is. And I think you’re actually putting language to what you’re seeing in your office. Like you said, I wish that men would just embrace the softer side, the emotional side, the in tune side, because I think it would – like for Billy – it would stop a lot of for his… and I won’t put words in his mouth, but he said it on the podcast, of just a road of destruction that he took just trying to find himself and being okay with. And it’s not less masculine, it’s different and it’s… Like we’ve talked about before, you know, we know who wears the pants in the family and it’s not even about that. It’s that he’s an emotionally available father, an emotionally available husband. He doesn’t put me in my place. He stands up for me and tells me to go do things, and he’s my number one support, and he listens, and he’s still a guy that I’m married to that irritates me. He still does things wrong.

[BILLY]:
What? What?

[BRANDY]:
But he’s able to come back to that and apologize. The next morning, you know, he’s able to see that and clean his side of the street.

[BILLY]:
Well, and all of these things don’t just come naturally to me, I just see them as things that I need, that need to be strengths, and not looked at as weaknesses. And I think we get into this dualistic thing in life, where it has to be either-or, it can’t be both ends. I’m not anti… if we’re in an apocalypse, and we have to defend ourselves, all these strengths of men and women need to come out. But when we come home, and we need to get on the floor and play with our kids, you need to be able to open yourself up a little bit. When you and your wife have a fight, you need to be able to surrender your ego a little bit and go say, I’m so sorry for being such an asshole. And when we can’t do that, that’s the destructive part of this macho, I’m just a man and I’m not going to apologize to anybody. That’s the BS story we’re trying to push back against.

[LAURA]:
Absolutely.

[BRANDY]:
Nice drop, Billy Eldridge. Nice drop.

[LAURA]:
I know. I think this episode is now over.

[BRANDY]:
I know we keep getting off, but go back to again what you were saying about the patterns you see, and in the chair, and just emotionally available men and women.

[LAURA]:
Yeah, well actually, it’s kind of funny. I’ve been realizing over the last few months as I’ve gotten more and more men coming to see me for therapy, individual therapy, I love working with the beta males. They are so much more in tune with what’s going on, and how their history, their background manifests in their current relationships. And I feel like we have such better conversations than the more alphas who, let’s be honest, they’re not the ones banging down my door to come to a counselor. They’re usually being forced in by like a spouse, or that’s generally it, or maybe their employer making them go, but they’re doing it begrudgingly. So just like Billy was explaining, oh, I don’t do anything wrong. This isn’t my problem. This is everyone else’s problem. Those are not generally the men that I enjoy working with. It’s the ones who, even on the surface, they might not look like this… whatever your listeners might perceive the ones who haven’t gotten on the beta male revolution bandwagon, they might perceive that the beta males look even softer, or weaker, something like that. But I see a lot of males who I would consider as beta males in my office who are gruff. They don’t look… and I’ve seen Billy obviously, in person. You don’t look like what a “beta male” might look like, you know, this like soft, weak, whatever the misconception is people have around what makes a beta male.

So my clientele, particularly the beta males, don’t look like that. It’s just once we start having this conversation about why they came to see me in the first place, maybe it starts off like work stress, difficulties in their relationships, but once we peel back some of those layers, there’s so much there that I wish more men felt comfortable to share that with their significant others. Because that, to me, is sexy. Like when a man can say, look, these are some things that are going on for me, or this is a way in which I felt disappointed growing up, or I’m having a hard time processing this thing that’s going on in my life. Like, when a man can actually use those words, and not just say, oh, it’s fine. I’m pissed off, I punched a wall. I’m good now. That doesn’t really give much opportunity for real connection.

[BILLY]:
Mm hmm. Well, and it surprised me that you say you work with a population of beta males. Because in your niche, and in what you focus on, I would think you would get a lot more alphas. We’re talking about executives and high performers. That’s kind of your niche, right?

[LAURA]:
Yeah, it is. And I do get them, don’t get me wrong, but I think that… it’s funny because you’re right, I do target the top performers, the entrepreneurs, the ones who are really killing it or crushing it at work. And the ones who come to me who are more of that alpha personality, they’re not coming on their own accord, generally. They’re being forced to come or they’re being told they have to come. And I, as an alpha female, don’t tend to do very well with them, because I’m going to challenge them, I’m going to be more direct. I don’t like, lean over and just eh, he challenged me.

[BRANDY]:
It’s so funny because Billy, being the resident beta, he does well with alphas. He works so well with the alpha men that are being told to go to counseling, and their wives are dragging them in, or they’ve been appointed from their work or whatever; he does so well with them. And I think that’s that yin and yang, it’s because he’s a beta he can sit there, pull back, listen, and then ask him those questions. It’s like, well, how’s that working for you? Because he is so non assuming and non judgmental, and he’s not going to get in their face, he’s going to let them do their thing, and then he’s going to help them through it. And I’m like you. I tell Billy all the time, I’d be a terrible therapist because I’d be like, you know, I’d be in your face, like, stop acting like that, let’s do this and move on, you know, and that’s why he’s so good at it. And then there’s you, being the opposite. And so I just see that as a pattern of just that yin and yang.

[LAURA]:
I think it’s important to know who you jive with, you know, who are you vibing with? And I can vibe with an alpha male. But more often than not, it’s a beta male. Those are the ones who I enjoy working with. And I think that that yin and yang you’re talking about, I mean, there’s so complimentary. If you go back to romantic relationships, I think the vast majority of romantic relationships are a beta with an alpha. For that reason. They’re very complimentary.

[BILLY]:
Well, and speaking of complimentary, it’s why we need each other in life. And I believe we don’t come into the world with everything we need. We’re not an island unto ourselves. We have to have community, and we have to have each other. And that’s what happened in Estes Park, Colorado, sitting with a cup of coffee, overlooking the mountains, and the elk running around outside, with the fire going, it was just wonderful. I need alphas in my life. We sat with you for just probably thirty, forty-five minutes, and you were able to get in, drill down, and pick things apart that if I would have been sitting with another beta, we would have been talking about our feelings and how things made us feel for five hours. And you’re just like, hey, here’s the deal, because in my mind, we’re at a conference where group practice is the buzzword, and everybody’s got to build some gigantic group practice with four hundred clinicians, and it’s a race to the top, and I’m like, this doesn’t feel like me. And nobody’s validating that feeling I’m having. And we sit down at coffee with you and within probably the first four minutes, you said, why would you build a group practice? Maybe that’s not for you. And then we started going into what that might look like, and what do you really want? You were able to just pick at things in a way that if I was with just someone who looked and acted like me, I could never get to the point. So I need that more alpha, drill down, get to the point, what’s going on, in my life.

[LAURA]:
But let’s look at the reverse of that. So because you are an amazing beta male, you were able to take all of that direct feedback, as opposed to just arguing with me and telling me why I’m wrong, I’ve only known you for four minutes, what the hell do I know? You were able to sit back and really reflect on that and go, hmm, maybe she’s got a point. Maybe I need to think about this. Is this what I really want? So you being a beta male actually helped that relationship, or that conversation that you and I had way more than if you were just, again, like I’m picturing the puffing of the chest, like, no, you’re wrong. I’m right. I know what I’m doing. I think you were so much more receptive, and that’s a result of you being more of that model beta male.

[BRANDY]:
You have so much substance, Laura. I don’t want to sit here – because Billy and I have a tendency to like, oh, that’s so good, that’s so good, and like fangirl, I like to say, on some of our guests. But with you, it is that. You have such substance. You’re [unclear] Laura, fun, creative and all these things, but you’re a good therapist and you’re a good coach, like, you can get to it quickly in your brief therapy, but also like executive coaching. You’re just good at it.

[BILLY]:
You’re a phenomenal writer.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah.

[BILLY]:
I read an article where you talked about going to a grocery store that sold beer.

[LAURA]:
Yeah. Lowes Foods. They’re awesome.

[BILLY]:
Yes. And I was just mesmerized by this article and just drawn in, and the way you talked about a grocery store, but it also sold beer on tap, and it was just the most fascinating story. But the way you’re able to craft your words and create that just helps other people when they’re looking at clarifying their message, and I think that’s one of the main things you do for therapists. Do you just work with therapists? Do you help other professionals?

[LAURA]:
Funny you would ask, Billy. So historically, I have solely worked with therapists and that’s still, right now, primarily who I serve, but there are definitely some… there are some cogs going in my brain because I have some people on my email list who are not therapists. I honestly don’t even know how they found me. I’ve got chiropractors, I’ve got a few dentists on my email list, and sometimes I’ll hear back from them and they’ll be like, you know, everything you teach can be applied to other industries. Have you considered branching out? So I will say that I’m thinking about it. I’m toying about working with other types of people. So for right now, therapists are mainly who I do business coaching with, just because I know it so well, like the ins and outs of setting up the business, all the business side of stuff. It’s a little bit different between mental health and some other industry.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. Well, I can’t wait to see what comes out in the months to come. One of my favorite questions to ask therapists is, why did you become a therapist?

[LAURA]:
To figure out my own shit.

[BRANDY]:
Yup.

[BILLY]:
And how’s that worked for you?

[LAURA]:
I think it did. I mean, I don’t think I’ll ever have it all figured out. But it helped me put pieces of my story together in a way that made sense. Whereas, when I was a young adult, or even a teenager, things that were happening around me, I had no idea why or how or how to fix it. So becoming a therapist, I think helped me heal.

[BILLY]:
Awesome.

[BRANDY]:
One of the things I want to say before we wrap it up, but I think that you have a authenticity that a lot of people are afraid of. You are able to be yourself, good, bad, ugly, all of it, in front of people, with people, and it’s made you stronger, it’s made you better. And I think for our listeners, for beta male revolution, I hope that’s one of the things that we bring into the living rooms, or the cars, or wherever people are listening, is that being who you are is very freeing and it may not be what everyone has accepted and normed, like, you know, BADASS Therapy, you’re going to get pushback, or Beta Male Revolution, we’re getting pushback for it. But being able to come into yourself so young, you did it young and most people don’t do it until later on. Can you just talk to our listeners about becoming themselves and being okay with themselves?

[LAURA]:
Yeah. I think, for me, I had some mentors along the way, whether they realized it or not, these were best selling authors, for example, whose stuff I just absorbed into my psyche. So people who I looked up to, who were polarizing in and of themselves, or who had a perspective on an issue that could be controversial. So I really looked up to those people and I think without them even knowing it, they modeled for me how liberating that can be, to just be who you are. Some people are going to love it, some people are not. And that’s okay. I’m not for everybody. None of us are meant to connect with everybody. So instead, I try to find the people who are meant to hear my message. Because I’m not everyone’s cup of tea but if I’m yours, you know it within about five seconds.

[BILLY]:
You’re our cup of tea, Laura.

[LAURA]:
And you’re mine.

[BILLY]:
Brandy said, you know, you present things to people that are difficult for some because of your authenticity and the way you put things out there. But the reason I think it’s difficult is because we longed for it, and we’re just afraid to do it ourselves. And there are just certain personalities out there in the world that just go and do it regardless of the cost. And I know for a big bulk of my life, that scared me to the core, and it produced massive amounts of dysfunction. But when I got more in line, into living the way I was just supposed to live, and the person I was supposed to be, things began to fall in place in a way I couldn’t have done it on my own. And so when stories like yours, I come across people like you, we just can’t help but want to talk to you and spend time with you because there’s just this attractiveness that you put off about the way you live in the world. And we thank you for that. In wrapping up, I’m going to ask you a couple questions. Laura Long, what’s the hardest lesson you’ve ever had to learn?

[LAURA]:
That change is the only constant. You have to keep evolving, and pivoting. When you think you know something, it changes.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, thank you. And one more. You talked about new things on the forefront, possibly for you. What inspires you to keep going, keep moving forward?

[LAURA]:
Emails I get from people who have taken something that I taught and they transformed their lives. That keeps me going, for sure. One hundred percent.

[BILLY]:
Laura, thank you for the work you do in the world. It was so awesome to talk to you and we can’t wait to see all your cool stuff that you continue to do.

[LAURA]:
Thank you guys so much for having me and for the work that you all are doing to put this new paradigm shift out into the world. It’s amazing. I love being a witness to it.

[BRANDY]:
Thanks, Laura.

[BILLY]:
Have a great day, Laura.

[BILLY]:
Are you ready to find freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find your strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your own skin and be the most authentic beta male, then our free Beta Male Revolution course is for you. Sign up for free at betamalerevolution.com/course.

This podcast is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. This is given with the understanding that neither the host, Practice of the Practice, or the guest are providing legal, mental health, or other professional information. If you need a professional, you should find one.

Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a network of podcasts seeking to help you thrive, imperfectly. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom Podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

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