Mild At Heart | Episode 3

Mild At Heart | BMR 03

Are you mild at heart? Do you ever feel like you have imposter syndrome? Are you living as your most authentic self?

In this podcast, Billy and Brandy Eldridge talk about embracing your authentic self and moving past the imposter syndrome. 

In This Podcast

Summary

  • What does the world tell you?
  • How did Brandy fall in love with a beta like Billy?

What does the world tell you?

For betas, a lot of the world tells you to man up and fake it to you make it. What they really mean is man up in an alpha way. This can cause a lot of people to try and become someone they’re not. It’s time to embrace your most authentic self and move past the fraud.

British Psychology states that imposter syndrome hits men harder than women. Imposter syndrome can also mean being a peacock or puffing out.

Do you ever feel like a kid playing dress-up in reality? Billy did, and he couldn’t keep it up. It wasn’t until later in life that he was able to take that mask off. There are rooms of people like Billy.

Now I have a seat at the table and have a different skill set to bring and people appreciate that.

How did Brandy fall in love with a beta like Billy?

Brandy knew Billy would love her more than she loved herself and would accept her for who she is. Where Billy and Brandy live, it’s not really culturally acceptable to be a beta. Brandy and Billy aren’t the typical southern family. Brandy doesn’t cook, Billy does, and he loves it. Brandy doesn’t want to be a stay at home mom. 

Through their marriage, Billy has been able to let Brandy be who she is and gave her permission to do so. They wanted to be 50/50 in everything together. It takes a really strong man to do that.

The number one comment people say on their relationship is, “well we know who wears the pants in this family” Billy responds with “I don’t even know what that means.”

Women will say things like, “We know Billy is sweet, compassionate, and kind but I’m sure he puts his foot down.” Brandy wonders what that means? Because Billy is the man, he gets to put his foot down?

The best, healthiest Billy is when he knows who and what he is, and he can impact the people he’s meant to impact. It’s such an easier load to carry than trying to be someone he’s not.

It’s okay to be mild at heart and it’s also okay to be wild at heart.

Are you ready to find the freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your skin and be the most authentic beta male, then our free beta revolution course is for you. Sign up for free.

Useful links:

Meet Billy Eldridge

billy-eldridge

Meet Billy, the resident beta male. For Billy, this is a place to hang out with other beta males and the people who love them. We’re redefining what beta males look like in the world. I have learned to embrace my best beta self, and I can help you to do the same. As a therapist, I understand the need to belong. You belong here. Join the REVOLUTION.

 

Meet Brandy Eldridge

brandy-eldridge

Hello, Beta friends. I am an alpha personality who is embracing the beta way of life. I feel alive when connected with people, whether that is listening to their stories or learning about their passions. Forget small talk, let’s go deep together. Come to the table and let’s have some life-changing conversations.

 

Thanks for listening!

Did you enjoy this podcast? Feel free to leave a comment below or share this podcast on social media! You can also leave a review of the Beta Male Revolution Podcast on iTunes and subscribe!

Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a network of podcasts seeking to help you thrive, imperfectly. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom Podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

Podcast Transcription

[BILLY]:
Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a family of podcasts seeking to change the world. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

Welcome to the Beta Male Revolution. This is a podcast for beta males, the people who love them, and the alphas that enjoy their company.

Welcome, we hope you’re having a fantastic day. We’re here, the Beta Male podcast, and today we’re going to talk about Imposter Syndrome. My name is Billy Eldridge and as always I have with me the wonderful Brandy Eldridge. Welcome. Glad you’re here.

[BRANDY]:
Hello. Thanks.

[BILLY]:
Well, it’s our hope today that by the end of this podcast, you’re able to embrace your most authentic self. To push past being a fraud and allow yourself to be seen for who you truly are. And we’re going to kind of look over the trajectory of this podcast, about how we both experienced that in our own lives, and how we’ve tried to overcome it, and how sometimes we still dip back into it from time to time.

[BRANDY]:
I mean, overcoming it, it’s like, every day. Every day, I have to talk myself out of putting on a fake suit, my female power suit. Not being an imposter. I feel like it every day.

[BILLY]:
Your Wonder Woman cape.

[BRANDY]:
My Wonder Woman cape, that I actually have, that you bought me.

[BILLY]:
That I bought you.

[BRANDY]:
You did, and I appreciate that. I have lots of comments on that. On the back of my chair at work, Billy bought me a Wonder Woman cape, and I even feel like an imposter sometimes with that because I think people look at it and say, oh, she’s so egotistical, like, she thinks she’s Wonder Woman. And really, it was like, I was taking on a lot and I started a new job and you were super supportive in it, and you like told me, you know, you’re my Wonder Woman. Here you go. It was really nice. Thank you.

[BILLY]:
I think it’s such a hard thing to overcome. I’m sitting here in my living room, with my wife, who accepts me unconditionally.

[BRANDY]:
Well, I don’t. I’ve always said that my love is very conditional. I don’t.

[BILLY]:
Who is more likely to accept me unconditionally than anyone else in the room.

[BRANDY]:
There you go.

[BILLY]:
And I have headphones on and I’m sitting in front of a mic and I’m thinking to myself, who in the world am I to have this conversation with the world? And then I have to remember, you know, if not us, who? If not now, when? And we just, we want to open it up. We want to offer a voice to this topic. And I think a lot of people are wandering around out in the world feeling like frogs.

[BRANDY]:
I think we have a society where we’re kind of taught that we need to… we’ve heard the term here a lot where we’re from – we just need to man up. We just need to buck up. Just, you know, fake it till you feel it.

[BILLY]:
And I think for a beta, that phrase in and of itself – man up. It’s man up in a certain way, man up in an alpha way.

[BRANDY]:
Yes, the connotation is negative. Absolutely, yeah, it’s to… you’ve got to earn this right to be a man. Okay, so there’s this research article I read, in the British psychology society research digest. And it was a study done last year and it says that under pressure, imposter syndrome hits men harder than women. I feel like an imposter. I’m in a doctoral program at a really good school. And I really went through like my first class thinking that I was a mercy take. And I’m not joking. Like, I was sitting in here with all these people that had Ivy League masters degrees and ran companies and made a lot more money than I did and they seem to get everything a lot quicker than I did and I sat in my class thinking oh, they must have got my application mixed up, or I was the mercy take, like, they needed a female in the nonprofit world and I couldn’t fake it. I was trying to, I was trying to kind of act like I knew what I was talking about, but the one or two times I tried doing that I just looked like a fool. And then it just reiterated the fact that I didn’t belong there. And I just remember feeling like I’m an imposter, like, the imposter syndrome term I used every day I was there and had to like do the Stuart Smalley, you’re good enough, you’re smart enough and doggone it, people like you. And it was so funny because I was in that class and I was walking in between classes with another student in the class and he said, you know, I really don’t think I belong here. I’m pretty sure they needed a brown guy, and that’s how I got in. And I went, oh, my gosh, I thought they needed like a… and he goes, they didn’t need you. You’re a white female, like, you’re not… I said, yeah, but I work in a nonprofit. So, I figured they needed a nonprofit hit. And he was like, oh, I’m so glad you said that, I’m like, I’m so glad you said that. And we both just felt like frauds that whole time. And it wasn’t until our professors came in and they said, hey, this first year in your doctoral program, people suffer from imposter syndrome. And they addressed it to the whole group. And I thought, well, if me and this other guy, like, we’re not the only ones in there.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. And tell me what it was like to be given permission to feel like a fraud.

[BRANDY]:
It was so freeing, because you’re looking around the room and you’re like, oh, I’m not the only fraud. We’re all frauds. And I’m sure there were a couple douchebags in there that were like, no, I belong. I got this.

[BILLY]:
I got this. I deserve this.

[BRANDY]:
But then I have to think, too, do they think that or was it just their insecurities playing into them and they kind of had to peacock? And that is what impostor syndrome is. Right?

[BILLY]:
Yeah. And I wonder at times… and I’ve wondered that as a beta male, does everybody feel this way? Does everybody feel at times like they’re a kid playing dress up in their adult life? And is this my reality? And sometimes I have to pinch myself, and I played a part for years. I remember working in metal fabrication, and in that world, and it was a very alpha, masculine world. And it was dog eat dog, and the way you showed love was to berate one another. And I don’t even know that we would have ever said, showing love, for sure. But I did not fit. And I knew every day I dreaded showing up at work and putting my clothes on because I knew that I was gonna have to play a part I was not built to play in the world. But I thought I had to be this guy to get the job, to keep the girl, to be who the world wanted me to be. And I was slowly dying on the inside. And I couldn’t keep it up. I could only keep it up for so long. And we talked in other episodes about how I dealt with that in unhealthy ways, through drugs and alcohol, to put a mask on. But it wasn’t until later in my life, I was able to begin to slowly take that mask off. And people began to encourage me, and give me permission to be who I am. I remember a camping trip with a friend of mine, Brian Carpenter, he was a pitcher at the University of Texas. He got drafted by the Dodgers, played minor league ball.

[BRANDY]:
He’s a man’s man.

[BILLY]:
He’s a tall guy, he builds furniture for fun and has a woodworking shop, and… talk about two guys, I’m a little short fella. Standing up next to him I already feel inferior. But I remember we went on this camping trip and as we climb out of the car and we get there, the day before I’d prepared this pot of gumbo and I’d put it in a crock pot. And I had a plug in my car. And I remember plugging it up and keeping it warm. And when we get there, Brian hops out, Phillip hops out, Brian’s got an axe, he’s chopping wood. He’s chopping wood for the fire, Phillips putting up the tent and I remember when Philip kneeled over his shirt kind of lifted up and I could see the handle of his pistol he had in the back as I’m over at the table, stirring the gumbo in the crock pot. And I’m like, you know, but at that moment, I realized I had something to bring to the table. And I put the rice in the bowls and the gumbo on it. And Brian just went on and on about how awesome it was that I had thought of everybody and thought to bring that. And he’s talked about that story for years. But I’m the guy that shows up with a crock pot full of food, that is Mr. Hospitality, wants to make sure everybody’s full. But when it comes to chopping the trees down, and I didn’t think to bring a weapon in case there’s a bear or something, I would have just gotten eaten by the bear. I’m so glad I have guys like Brian and Philip in my life. But I thought, I never knew that they valued having me in their life.

[BRANDY]:
Right? Because, I mean, how many men would say that. I mean, like, your friends tease you a lot and make fun of you a lot in a wonderful, sweet…

[BILLY]:
In a wonderful way.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah. And they’re pretty open minded when it comes to that because they recognize what you do bring to the table, and you don’t just bring a crock pot with the Betty Crocker lining in it so you don’t mess the crock pot up. But you bring, really, you’ve got a lot of wisdom. You’ve lived a life that’s been pretty tumultuous at times. And you self-reflect on that all the time and you work to be a better person and they recognize that in you. I don’t think they need you to bring the axe, and if they’re comfortable with you bringing the crock pot, I think that we’ve…

[BILLY]:
Crock pot full of gumbo. It was a man’s gumbo. It was a hearty gumbo.

[BRANDY]:
I know how you make your Gumbo, and your chili, which is more like a stew. It’s not even a… we’re not even gonna talk about that right now. But…

[BILLY]:
It was good gumbo.

[BRANDY]:
I know it was, but I love the fact that your friends recognize that in you. And the brotherhood that you have in spite of being a little different, and different in a good way.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. And it was. It was me coming into a realization that I have a seat at the table, and I belong here, and I bring a different skill set that’s not less valuable, it’s equal in value. And I wrestled with that for years because I would pretend to be the axe guy. I would pretend to be the guy that knew what I was talking about when I spoke of football and guns. But that just wasn’t my area of interest, and that wasn’t where I came alive. That’s not where I felt life. And, you know, I remember feeling like so scared in the 90s. I love music. We love music together. We go to lots of concerts. And I remember this festival touring, it was called Lilith Fair.

[BRANDY]:
Wait a minute. Did you go to Lilith Fair?

[BILLY]:
I didn’t go to Lilith Fair. It was, today I would go, and I would rock out on the front row with hands in the air. But I felt like I couldn’t go because it wasn’t like a “man’s concert”.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah, no, it’s specifically not a man’s concert.

[BILLY]:
But the music was so good. We’re talking about Indigo Girls, Natalie Merchant, Sarah McLachlan, Your Love is Better than Ice Cream, I just melt. You know, I think I was probably at home, like, listening to Cranberries – Linger, crying about not getting my Lilith Fair tickets.

[BRANDY]:
Wait a minute, you remember, like, so when we first started dating you made me a CD.

[BILLY]:
Yeah.

[BRANDY]:
I’m just now putting all this together, like, you had multiple Lilith Fair people on that CD. I should have known by then. I did though, I did though.

[BILLY]:
Acoustic guitar and harmonies with female voices gets me every time. And I’m sold at that. And I so wanted… and I’m like, I can’t go to that. All my friends are going to, like, metal and rock. But it’s like, I felt like I couldn’t tell anybody. So that was the first time I was like, I couldn’t put a thing to it, but I was like, I really like this music. I’m drawn to it. It’s emotional, it resonates, it causes angst in my heart.

[BRANDY]:
But you’re a deep thinker and you’re a sensitive guy. And the fact that there are guys out there like you that might be afraid to talk about that, but there’s rooms of people like you, and it doesn’t have to be an either-or. You don’t have to be an alpha or a beta. You just happen to be a beta; you just happen to be a very prime example of a beta. But it doesn’t have to be that way. And I think where we are, and again, where we are it’s very culturally unacceptable to be a beta.

[BILLY]:
Yeah.

[BRANDY]:
And you’ve kind of had to live through that. And it’s your own…

[BILLY]:
I don’t know. What about for you though? I mean, am I magnifying the difference between alphas and betas in the south?

[BRANDY]:
You magnify it just by being you.

[BILLY]:
But how have you seen that play out?

[BRANDY]:
I think in our marriage, it plays out all the time, because I was raised by an alpha dad, and somewhat of an alpha female.

[BILLY]:
Well, how did you fall in love with a beta like me?

[BRANDY]:
Oh, man, that’s, uh, I guess we’re gonna go there. You… I knew you would love me more than I could love myself. I knew that you were open minded enough to accept me. I remember when we… I mean, we’d known each other for a long time, but I remember we had that conversation right before we got married. I just kind of said to you, like, hey, this is gonna be 50/50 like in everything we do. It’s gonna be 50/50 because we’re in a place where that’s not the case, in our culture.

[BILLY]:
So, where we live, what is it like?

[BRANDY]:
I’m gonna say it, ooh.

[BILLY]:
Hopefully, friends and family don’t listen.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah. We are in the… again, we talk about it, we’re not only in the Bible Belt; we are in the buckle. Smack dab in the middle of old religion.

[BILLY]:
It’s not a normal buckle, it’s like a rodeo buckle, it’s huge. It’s got rhinestones on it.

[BRANDY]:
I want to say stuff, but I know I can’t because I don’t want to offend the population of people that are here, and it works for them. But for me, it didn’t. I am not the typical Southern wife. I don’t cook. You cook.

[BILLY]:
Yeah.

[BRANDY]:
You’re fantastic at it.

[BILLY]:
I love cooking.

[BRANDY]:
I am not a stay at home mom. I don’t want to be a stay at home mom because that’s not good for me. It’s not healthy for me. And there are women that do it and do it fantastically. I don’t. I love my kids more when I work. I feel like I spend better time with them, all that to say, culturally, I’m considered a liberal here, and I’m considered kind of a freak when it comes to the way of thinking around here, and progressive. And that’s not acceptable here. And the fact that I said that to you, and you looked at me like, I don’t even know why you would ever say that. Like, of course, that’s the way it’s gonna be, was so refreshing and so freeing, like, giving me permission to be who I am. And through our marriage, you’ve given me permission to be who I am, because I am more of an alpha and I hate labels, but I am more of an alpha, I’m more driven and could be considered aggressive.

[BILLY]:
She said it. It’s on. It’s recorded now.

[BRANDY]:
You weren’t looking at it. But you gave me permission to just do what I needed to do, to be happy, and to be me. And here, in our neck of the woods, that’s not always the case. And when I said 50/50 and everything you were like, yeah, of course.

[BILLY]:
And if I would have been brave enough to go to Lilith Fair and you would have been there, you know, maybe we would have fell in love a lot earlier, because I would have seen the strong, powerful woman. And that was an empowering women’s movement. And I don’t know why I thought I had to be weaker to be there.

[BRANDY]:
That’s so.. it’s so sexy when you say that. I believe that it takes a really strong person to be married to a strong person. It takes a really strong man to say, you know what? Here you go, I’m going to cheerlead for you, I’m going to support you. I’m going to let you shine and not have to feel like… because I’ve been in relationships before, where when that happened, the other person felt super insecure. And it shined a spotlight on all their insecurities when they saw strength in someone else.

[BILLY]:
Okay, well, we’ll see if you get this – what’s the number one comment we get about our relationship? You being…

[BRANDY]:
Oh, we know who wears the pants in the family.

[BILLY]:
There we go.

[BRANDY]:
And what do you say?

[BILLY]:
I don’t even know what that means.

[BRANDY]:
That’s my favorite answer.

[BILLY]:
I don’t even know what that means.

[BRANDY]:
What does that even mean?

[BILLY]:
It’s an uncomfortable statement to me, that it has to be either-or.

[BRANDY]:
So I get all the time, all the time, whenever I’m having conversations with women, friends, they’ll say stuff like, well, we know that Billy’s sweet, and compassionate, and kind, and all that good stuff that you are, but I’m sure he puts his foot down. I’m sure even, you know, he even has his times where he puts his foot down, and I’m thinking, what does that mean? Like, because you’re the man, you have the right to put your foot down. I’m like, let him try to put his foot down and see what happens.

[BILLY]:
I think I’ve tried. But here’s the thing. I think we’ve both tried in our relationship, at times, to put our foot down. But that doesn’t exude our best selves. That’s us just trying to exercise authority over one another. And we as a couple are never our best selves when we’re doing that. It’s when we’re working in tandem, and moving through this life hand in hand, side by side, for the greater good of our family and the world around us. That’s who and what I want to be.

[BRANDY]:
That’s who I fell in love with. That’s why when Timothy’s Billy came out, I was like, whoa, yeah, that’s not…

[BILLY]:
Yeah. That’s a throwback to the first episode.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah. And I mean, it’s always gonna… we’re probably gonna bring up Timothy’s Billy every now and then, but that’s a perfect example of imposter syndrome, was just you felt that you needed to do that to impress me because somebody told you did, or because you’d been in a culture where that was acceptable.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. And then I had… the true imposter syndrome is me trying to be anyone that I’m not, that I am truly not. And that is Timothy’s Billy. That’s alpha Billy. That’s ego Billy. The best me is more of a healthy beta version. That understands that I don’t run high on needing to exercise my authority, or my will, over other people. That feels gross to me. It doesn’t wear well. I know there are natural leaders that lead well, and that are healthy alphas, and I love those kind of folks. But I also know I’m not that either. And that’s the kind of conversations we’re wanting to have when it comes to the Beta Male Revolution. Who are we? What are we? How do we talk about us? We look forward to other people adding to the conversation.

[BRANDY]:
Well, you know, the title of this episode is Mild At Heart.

[BILLY]:
Yeah.

[BRANDY]:
I remember there was… I have to tell this story. You tell it so much better but, for a little while you drove a Prius.

[BILLY]:
Yeah.

[BRANDY]:
Because it got great gas mileage and you were working 100 miles away or something.

[BILLY]:
In McCurtain County, Oklahoma. Let’s just name it.

[BRANDY]:
Okay.

[BILLY]:
The South. Deep South.

[BRANDY]:
Okay. Yeah. Which makes a difference because you’re going into a deep subculture of pickup trucks and rifles and all sorts of stuff that we don’t have.

[BILLY]:
It’s duallys and rebel flags.

[BRANDY]:
Yes.

[BILLY]:
And I love that place. And I love those people.

[BRANDY]:
And they accepted you.

[BILLY]:
And they accepted me because I was at a place in my life where I could go in and be my Prius driving self.

[BRANDY]:
Yes. But do you remember we had a small dog at the time, a very small dog, and it was cold, and you’d put a scarf on, you have glasses, you had the small dog in your car. And you were driving next to duallys and it was funny because nobody really appreciated your Prius where we are from, but then we went to Austin and everybody, all the guys were like giving you like the hey, what’s up, nice Prius.

[BILLY]:
We went to Austin for a work trip for you, and everybody kind of would make fun and if I was behind a dually, they have this thing called coal-rolling where they blow black soot out of the back of their truck because it’s like intentionally giving the middle finger to the environment, and especially when you’ve got a Prius behind you, it’s just kind of a… And so, I would go into these hospitals and work with these adolescents and kids as a therapist, and they thought it would be funny to blow black smoke all over my little…

[BRANDY]:
It kinda is funny.

[BILLY]:
And I would just drive up beside him and laugh and have a good time with it. But we did, we went to Austin and for the first time in my life, I pulled up to a little sushi restaurant while you were in a conference…

[BRANDY]:
With your Burberry scarf wrapped around your neck.

[BILLY]:
And I get out and the guy goes, nice car. I was like, I am in an alternate universe.

[BRANDY]:
He was like a manly man.

[BILLY]:
He was like a real guy.

[BRANDY]:
Like, letting his beta out.

[BILLY]:
I think he even tapped my hood. He said, nice car. I was like, hell yeah. I found out where I’m a badass. It’s in Austin, Texas.

[BRANDY]:
Only if you’re in a Prius. But you are the mild at heart. We’ve kind of thrown that around for a long time. And you’ll have to tell me the story and remember where we got the mild at heart.

[BILLY]:
Well, we grew up in evangelical, Christiandom, in the deep south, in church, and there was a book that went around called Wild at Heart by a guy named John Eldredge – no relation, different spelling – and it was just all the rage. And I remember getting my copy and being so excited and I was going to go through a Bible study with some other men. And I opened it up and I began to read it, and the concept in and of itself was good. It was well meaning. But it totally didn’t fit me, and here I reengaged in putting my imposter suit on and talking with these guys like this book meant something to me. But it was about going out into the wild and every man longs for some grand adventure. And I’m like, grand adventure? I like Netflix, and hanging out, and going to movies, and music, and concerts, and I don’t need to go to the outback, or climb a mountain, or rappel. None of that meant anything to me. So, over time, I reframed, and came up with another term – mild at heart. And I remember a quote in there that ‘the glory of God is man fully alive’. I believe it was Saint Irenaeus who said that, and in the way it quoted in there, like, man fully alive is achieving his adventure, going out there. But to me, being fully alive, and the glory of God being seen through that, is me being fully aware, fully present, in the moment. It’s a self-actualization of sorts. When I know who and what I am, and I accept myself as that, and begin to operate that way in the world, in an authentic way, there is something that shines that can’t be created by being fake. And I impact the people I’m meant to impact, and I don’t for the people I’m not. And it’s such an easier load to carry than trying to walk around the world and be somebody I’m not.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah, it’s that your anxiety can leave, your feelings of less than, that imposter syndrome. That’s the fix right there.

[BILLY]:
It was a bit of a relief today to hear you talk because I forget at times, because I assume you can carry the weight of the world on your shoulders and you just wake up full of confidence and zeal…

[BRANDY]:
I mean, I do sometimes.

[BILLY]:
For tackling the world, and I look at you at times, and I forget – I forget I need to check in with you and see how your day is going and how you feel. Because I just assume you’ve got it.

[BRANDY]:
Thank you for saying that.

[BILLY]:
And I’m sorry at times for assuming that you don’t need some softness, and that you don’t need me to come to you and ask if you’re okay, and are you feeling your best self, because you’re the alpha in my life enough. I just assume you can carry everything and you’re strong enough. But to hear you talk about USC and walking around there and… I wasn’t there with you. I want to be your biggest cheerleader in life. And I think that’s part of my betaness. And for guys who that doesn’t feel comfortable for, I would love to teach ways to be that way. And guys who really are that way, who’ve thought they need to be a little tougher, and not have emotionally in tune conversations with their spouse and with their friends – why don’t we learn how to do that together? And I appreciate what you teach me. But what you also reveal in me that I still need to work on.

[BRANDY]:
That’s good. Thank you. I teared up a little bit. That’s nice to hear. Thank you. Yeah. Well, I hope that hopefully some people relate to that and it’s easier for them to let their guard down. Take the facemask off.

[BILLY]:
It’s okay to be mild at heart.

[BRANDY]:
It’s okay to be mild. I love my mild at heart; I love my beta male.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. And it’s okay to be wild at heart.

[BRANDY]:
Absolutely. I love our alphas. Yeah. Thanks, Billy.

[BILLY]:
Well, in closing today, we look forward to creating a community where we can talk about all these things. We welcome pushback. We welcome deep conversations that surround around this. And we don’t know everything there is to know, so we can’t wait to bring in people, to hear your feedback. Go to the website betamalerevolution.com and leave your comments. Make sure you…

[BRANDY]:
Subscribe, rate, review.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, do all that fun stuff.

[BRANDY]:
Till next time.

[BILLY]:
Till next time. Thank you guys for tuning in.

[BRANDY]:
Live beta.

[BILLY]:
Are you ready to find freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find your strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your own skin and be the most authentic beta male, then our free Beta Male Revolution course is for you. Sign up for free at betamalerevolution.com/course.

This podcast is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. This is given with the understanding that neither the host, Practice of the Practice, or the guest are providing legal, mental health, or other professional information. If you need a professional, you should find one.

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