Part 2, Dr. Paul Corona: Three Keys to Revolutionize Your Relationships | Episode 17

Part 2, Dr. Paul Corona: Three Keys to Revolutionize Your Relationships | Episode 17

What are the three habits to avoid when building relationships? What three habits will revolutionize the way you build relationships? What can you do today to help you find fulfillment?

In this podcast episode, Billy and Brandy Eldridge speak with Dr. Paul Corona about the three keys to revolutionizing your relationships.

Meet Dr. Paul Corona

Dr. Paul L. Corona is a clinical professor of leadership in the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, where his teaching and coaching ratings average 96/100. Paul is also the founder of the award-winning Lee’s 3 Habits system, which helps motivated professionals and organizations build stronger relationships and achieve greater happiness – and he’s the author of The Wisdom of Walk-Ons: 7 Winning Strategies for College, Business and Life.

As a Leading Global Coach award winner, Paul was considered for the first Thinkers50 Marshall Goldsmith Coaching & Mentoring Award (the Thinkers50 Awards have been called “the Oscars” of management thinking).

During the past 35 years, Paul has transformed himself from a business person into a performance improvement specialist. He previously held a variety of leadership roles in Fortune 500 corporations, a Big 4 accounting and consulting firm, and major research universities.

Most importantly, Paul is a husband, parent, and friend.

Visit Dr. Corona’s website and connect on LinkedIn.

In This Podcast

Summary

  • Lee’s 3 Habits
  • Telling, talking, taking versus asking, listening, giving
  • Finding fulfillment
  • The happiness scale
  • What we can do today to help start this journey

Lee’s 3 Habits

The “Lee’s 3 Habits” system is based on the idea that almost everybody wants to be happier and one of the most important factors towards true happiness is strong relationships. The most effective way to build strong relationships is to be less focused on ourselves and be more focused on the other person and to:

  • Do a better job of demonstrating three habits:
    1. Asking
    2. Listening
    3. Giving
  • More than the opposite:
    1. Telling
    2. Talking
    3. Taking

The way that the other person sees us more focused on them and caring more about them is by how well we ask them insightful questions, how well we listen to them, and how well we give them things like respect, service, or an idea.

Watch the 3-minute micro-movie here.

Telling, talking, taking versus asking, listening, giving

When the natural Billy, the selfish, self-centered, I want what I want when I want it Billy walks into a room and he’s the telling, talking, taking person, it’s not the healthiest part of his being. It is born out of insecurity and wanting people to like him. He wants to tell people how important he is so he gets feedback and validation, but this actually pushes people away.

When he is on the learning and listening side, people come in closer and establish more authentic relationships with him. Billy wonders why it is so hard to do the right thing and so natural to do the thing that pushes people away?

If we go back to the beginning of time, we had to be self-focused in order to survive. Now, in cities and suburbs, we do it to thrive. We think that saying something funny or intelligent will help us thrive and be happier, that if we show how accomplished we are, that’s going to make us feel secure. It’s just another manifestation of self-absorption.

Finding fulfillment

If you’re still wondering if you’re fulfilled, you’re probably not fulfilled yet.

Purpose is this ultimate significant, positive impact we have to/want to make. It is something that makes us feel strong, energized, and inspired. Dr. Paul likes to call this your legacy. This could be very different for different people and but just have a purpose, have something that is meaningful to you. When you have strong relationships and a deep purpose, both of which you define, then you’ll have this feeling of true fulfillment. You’ll feel contentment, you’ll feel joy, you’ll feel something positive.

The happiness scale

I think it takes work to be happy, I think it takes work to be fulfilled.

Dr. Paul is usually an 8 on a scale of 1 – 10 when it comes to happiness/fulfillment but can go down to a 4 very quickly depending on who he’s with, where he is, or what he’s doing. If something triggers him negatively and feels that coming, he literally tries to pull a stop sign up in front of himself with bells and whistles. This takes a nanosecond and he will try to think through what’s going on and what’s behind it.

He will then try to either confront the situation in a healthy way or he might back off and go for a walk. That’s the immediate thing. The long term thing is every night and every day, he has a very disciplined system that gives him the chance to do that. He is constantly thinking about how well he asks, listens, and gives. He is constantly thinking about what he is doing and if he can do it better, and what he needs to do to be his best self, to try and stay at an 8, striving for a 9. That’s where it’s not easy, we’re well-intentioned but don’t always want to do the work.

What we can do today to help start this journey

  • Post the “ask, listen, give” reminder at work, at home, on the refrigerator, on your computer, and read it every morning.
  • Rate yourself every night on how well you did.
  • Get an accountability partner to talk with every week.

Most people either don’t have time or the desire to put in this work, and it’s normal. That’s why it is so hard, that’s why a lot of people don’t have true fulfillment. Don’t wait until you’re in too much pain before you do the work and don’t have this fantasy where you now know exactly what your whole meaning of life is and then you’re going to start doing the work. Most people are in between those two extremes.

It’s about progress, not perfection, and if you just set these ideals out in front of you and give yourself a little bit of room, you’ll realize you’re going to get it right by doing it wrong sometimes.

Books mentioned in this episode

Are you ready to find the freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your skin and be the most authentic beta male, then our free beta revolution course is for you. Sign up for free.

Useful links:

Meet Billy Eldridge

billy-eldridge

Meet Billy, the resident beta male. For Billy, this is a place to hang out with other beta males and the people who love them. We’re redefining what beta males look like in the world. I have learned to embrace my best beta self, and I can help you to do the same. As a therapist, I understand the need to belong. You belong here. Join the REVOLUTION.

 

Meet Brandy Eldridge

brandy-eldridge

Hello, Beta friends. I am an alpha personality who is embracing the beta way of life. I feel alive when connected with people, whether that is listening to their stories or learning about their passions. Forget small talk, let’s go deep together. Come to the table and let’s have some life-changing conversations.

 

Thanks for listening!

Did you enjoy this podcast? Feel free to leave a comment below or share this podcast on social media! You can also leave a review of the Beta Male Revolution Podcast on iTunes and subscribe!

Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a network of podcasts seeking to help you thrive, imperfectly. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom Podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

Podcast Transcription

[BILLY]:
Beta Male Revolution is part of the Practice of the Practice Podcast Network, a family of podcasts seeking to change the world. To hear other podcasts like the Bomb Mom podcast, Imperfect Thriving, or Empowered and Unapologetic, go to practiceofthepractice.com/network.

Welcome to the Beta Male Revolution. This is a podcast for beta males, the people who love them, and the alphas that enjoy their company.

Hey, Beta Male Revolution. The Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University is the number two business school in America. And we had the honor and privilege of talking to their clinical professor of leadership, Dr. Paul Corona. It was such an interesting conversation that we had to break it down into two different podcasts. In the beginning he goes into fulfillment and what true fulfillment means, and it’s not what you think. And then we move on into his simple yet proven and effective strategy – three keys to just revolutionizing any relationship that you’re in. He comes from a business standpoint, but when I read it and I looked at it, you can use it in a marriage, in your life, in your community, to change the way you see the world. And so, guys, here we go. Dr. Paul Corona.

Absolutely, absolutely. It was born out of dissatisfaction, and this restlessness in you.

[PAUL]:
Yeah.

[BRANDY]:
Well, we assume.

[BILLY]:
Yeah, no, I mean, you said that there was this… you were a student who was sitting there, bored, and not getting it and it’s like, how can you reach that person? And out of that, you know, you became who you are today. But Lee’s 3 – I love this model for the way to live in the world. And I’m going to say that after I’ve done a lot of talking today. And the first time that I read this, we were talking earlier, man, I felt it was the good kind of shame, some shame creeped in, because I watched your three minute video and I began to read your book. And when you say people tell, talk, and take too much, I still have big parts of that in my life today, but in my 20s and 30s it was all over me. And Brandy and I tell the story about how she calls me Timothy’s Billy and Timothy’s was a nice restaurant here in town and on our first date, I took her there, and I was this guy full of imposter syndrome and trying to be cool. And I was talking and telling and taking so much, it was just a nasty version of me. And I look back at that, and I had to be that to be who I am today; I had to go through that. But there is some evaluating, when have I been there, so could you kind of take us through Lee’s 3 and what you’ve learned about a better way to be in the world?

[PAUL]:
Yeah, sure. And thanks for telling us that, I mean, that’s an act of vulnerability right there. And that’s exactly what I think so many of us experience, but don’t make sense of and don’t tell. So, the Lee’s 3 Habits system is based on the idea that almost everybody wants to be happier. And one of, if not the most important factor toward true happiness is strong relationships. And my take, my take, is the best way to build stronger relationships – in other words, the most efficient the most effective way to build strong relationships – is to be less focused on ourselves and be more focused on the other person and to try to do a better job of demonstrating three habits: asking, listening, and giving, more than the opposite: telling, talking, and taking. So the way the other person sees us more focused on them, caring more about them, is by how well we ask them insightful questions, how well we listen to them closely and carefully, and how well we give them something like respect, or service, or an idea. And so, you said, Billy, you may have done this a little too much on the first date. Brandy, I hope you’re glad that you stuck through that first date. And you know, I still do this every day. It’s human nature. That’s why this micro movie that you talk about, that illustrates the concept, is a two-part transformation of Lee. In the first part, we call him Natural-Lee, get it? Naturally, we’re all self-absorbed. And then Better-Lee is once we learn how we’re coming across to others. So, the idea of asking, listening, and giving is so simple it’s almost off putting. However, what I’ve seen, myself and then observing others and then helping others, it’s really hard to be a world class asker, listener, giver, at the leadership level, as a parent, as just a good friend. And so, it’s natural if you struggle, I still do. But the problem is some people don’t care, or some people care but they don’t want to do the work. It takes work to change your behaviors and habits, that’s why this is called Lee’s 3 Habits.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. When the natural me, the selfish, self-centered, ‘I want what I want when I want it’ me walks into a room and I’m that telling, talking, taking person it’s not from the healthiest part of my being; it’s born out of insecurity. I want validation. I want people to like me. I want to tell them how important I am. So, I get some feedback. But the funny thing is in doing all that, I push people away, and I drive them away. But when I’m that other learning to listen, and to be present with another human being, the opposite happens, they come in closer and I establish more of an authentic relationship with them. And I just, I wonder sometimes why it’s so hard to do the right thing and so natural to do the thing that drives people away. But I think it comes a lot from you know, when we get into psychology, childhood, insecurities, and stuff we have to work through.

[PAUL]:
Yeah, I’m right with you, man. I think you’re spot on. And if you go back to the beginning of time, we are self-focused in order to survive, and those we’re responsible for, we’re helping them in order to survive, literally. Back in the beginning of the human race, there is fight and flight, and there’s predators, and they’re scarce resources. So, we had to be self-focused in order to survive. Now, I think we do it in cities and in suburbs, to thrive, right? Oh, let me tell you about what I did in college, or let me tell you about how my kids are doing, or let me tell you about where I’m donating, or, you know, we think it’s going to help us thrive and be happier, or, you were alluding to this earlier, like, oh, if we say something funny, or if we say something intelligent, or we show how accomplished we are, that’s gonna make us feel more secure because they’re gonna like us more; they’re gonna be impressed. And as you said, oftentimes it does the exact opposite.

[BRANDY]:
Exact opposite.

[PAUL]:
And so, I think it’s still natural. I think it’s still natural. We’re not always trying to survive. Some of us sometimes are literally trying to survive. But now, for people who are lucky enough to have a more peaceful, safe life, now we’re trying to thrive. And it’s just another manifestation of self-absorption. It doesn’t mean we’re evil – it’s how we’re hardwired.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah.

[BILLY]:
The thing I love about it, it’s a three-minute video, and a 30-minute book. And some of the hardest things that I run into in counseling sessions is giving people these deep, weighty books with a lot of clinical data that means nothing to them, and they just want the nuts and bolts of how do you deal with life? How can I make my relationship better? And even though this is a leadership book, and I found this with a lot of leadership books, if you can frame it in a marital relationship way, the truths are all the same. It’s all relational. So, you know, asking, listening, and giving. If I can hand somebody – and I hate to be sexist, but it’s usually guys that won’t read the literature I give them – but if I say, here’s a three minute video and a 30 minute book, a smile kind of comes over their face and they’re like, I don’t have to read some huge dissertation on why my marriage is a total wreck? I’m like, if you could learn to do these three things, it would change..

[BRANDY]:
Hey, Billy, if you would learn to do these three things when we’re speaking to each other, that would be a… just a 30-minute book. I want you to go ahead and read it.

[BILLY]:
Is there anything you would like to share, Brandy? I’m trying, Paul. I’m trying here.

[BRANDY]:
No, I see what you’re doing there and it’s not naturally, but I appreciate the effort.

[BILLY]:
Is there anything I can do to help this interview go better, sweetheart?

[BRANDY]:
That’s really good. Yeah, we’ll talk offline. No, but it is. It is really easy. But it’s the hardest thing, and you simplify things very well and you don’t give yourself enough credit. You always say things like, well, it’s the obvious thing. And maybe it is. But when you simplify it the way you do, and have a 30-minute book, it is so complicated. It’s not simple, because… and I’m so glad that you shared earlier, you still have to remind yourself of this, because even when we talk about active listening, we did that several episodes ago, this is even a simpler version of it, but it is still so hard to sit there and not talk and really listen for the purpose of understanding. And I have to remind myself all the time, and I’ll go into meetings, and then after I leave the meeting, I’m like, man, I talked that whole time. Like, how did that help? It didn’t. I needed to listen, I needed to ask better questions. That’s why I love that it’s a habit because it’s this constant work that maybe one day I’ll do it naturally because I’ve practiced it so much.

[BILLY]:
It’ll happen when we go back and edit this podcast. I’ll listen to it. I’m like, why did you talk so damn much? He was there to teach you how to listen and all you did was speak to him. So, I’m going to be quiet now, and ask you in living this way in your life, how difficult has it been? And in going through that, how did you find your WHY? And what does fulfillment mean to you? Nothing big, just easy questions.

[PAUL]:
Yeah. So, could we please take those one at a time, Billy, they’re all great questions. Can we go… which one do you want me to answer first?

[BILLY]:
On the Lee’s 3, what kind of struggles did you have to go through to come to these truths? That you need to listen more and…?

[PAUL]:
Yeah, yeah. So, the truth of it is it probably started way, way back. And Billy, you can shrink my head offline if you want. This might be helpful. I’m very lucky; I came from a loving family, youngest of five kids, and when you’re the youngest of five kids, all of whom are somewhat opinionated, it’s sometimes not easy to get airtime. And so, I probably, growing up, wanted to be listened to a little more. And then, a lot of well-intentioned people out of the house, you know, when you talk about school systems and athletic fields and jobs, they try to tell you what they think you should do. And over the course of a lifetime, I probably resisted that. I probably wanted to be listened to more. And I didn’t like to be told what to do. I don’t know if that’s some like serious, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Billy, or just like, I’m some person who just was that way, but that’s probably where all this started. And then as I mentioned earlier when I tried to figure out my why, and I felt that this would make me a better coach and a better teacher, facilitator, these tools really helped me in my professional life and in my personal life. The most important thing of all is this way of living, these three habits, asking, listening, and giving, make me I believe a better life partner and a better parent. And that’s really ultimately all that matters.

Now, I’m not just saying that to be nice, or to say something that I’m supposed to say. I really believe that even though I struggle with it. I still work too much on my professional life sometimes. I still spend too many hours, too much effort, too much focus. So, don’t think I’ve got this all figured out. I don’t. But what I’m trying to say is my number one priority – health, relationships, progress – is rooted in this too. So, I’m trying to live this way as a parent, as a life partner, and as a helper. So, I took these ideas which I know, Brandy, you say, well, they may be obvious but they’re not easy, and these ideas have been around since the beginning of time but I’m trying to make them more accessible through, like you said, Billy, this three minute micro movie, this 30 minute handbook. And by the way, if I could have made the handbook shorter, I would have; I couldn’t.

[BILLY]:
I love it.

[PAUL]:
And then the system, we’ve got to stay on track by being disciplined. So, it’s all that. That’s a long answer to your first question, Billy.

[BILLY]:
No, it’s a beautiful answer and an answer that we needed. And I think some of the most complex truths in life are so simple, we miss them. And it is just a journey that we make this road by walking it, and it takes missteps to get it right, and I appreciate you open it up about your early life and how it kind of brought you here. And so, when we move towards fulfillment, what really matters in life – and you probably already spoke to it when you spoke of family and the things that really matter. When you find successful people, people that have it all, people you’ve worked with, that are unhappy, when they work through the process that you take them through, and maybe they find fulfilment, and you find fulfillment, what does that usually look like?

[PAUL]:
Yeah, thanks. I could try to hit on some highlights to make the simple sound easy. And as we already discussed, it’s challenging to actually pull this off. So, I really try to meet people where they are and let them define what strong relationships are for them. Let them define what deep purpose means to them, and help them realize then, what the fulfillment is going to look like is their definition. And relationships for me are going to focus first on my family, and then my friends, and then my colleagues. If somebody wants to flip that order, that’s cool with me. I’m just trying to help them do what they want to do. What I’m trying to say is, I, as your helper, don’t care what order you put that in, but I do firmly believe you need to focus on relationships.

And then purpose. To me, it’s this ultimate significant positive impact we have to make, or we want to make. It’s something that makes us feel strong and energized and inspired. And I like to call it your legacy. What do you want them to say about you when it’s all over, behind your back, because I don’t care what they say at your birthday party when you’re old, or even at your eulogy. They have to say nice things there. What do you want your legacy to be behind your back? So, to me, that’s purpose. Now, that could be very different for different people. I want them to say, Paul really helped bring out the best in others. But Billy might say something very different; Brandy might say something very different. I’m cool with whatever you want your purpose to be – I’m just saying, have a purpose. Have something that’s meaningful to you. And when you have the strong relationships and the deep purpose, both of which you define, then I believe you’ll have this feeling of true fulfillment, which is a feeling – I don’t think it’s much of an intellectual, cognitive experience. You’ll feel contentment, you’ll feel joy, you’ll feel something positive. And if you’re still wondering if you’re fulfilled, you’re probably not fulfilled yet.

[BRANDY]:
You say in your book, that you are most of the time about an eight, on a scale of one to ten, happiness, fulfillment, you’re about an eight, but you can go down to a four very quickly. What are the steps that you do? What are the reminders you say to yourself, like, what’s something tangible that people can do to get back up the scale?

[PAUL]:
Yeah, boy, that’s a great question. And I do, I can drop very fast depending on who I’m with, where I am, and what I’m doing. If something kind of triggers me negatively, whether it’s my own issue or something on the outside. When I feel that coming, I try to literally pull a stop sign up in front of myself, with bells and whistles that go off like you’re approaching a train track and a stop light comes on and the gates go down. I try to do this when I feel it coming on and, you know, this takes like a nanosecond to happen. And then I try to think through what’s going on. What’s behind this? And then I try to either confront the situation in a healthy way by saying something that’s appropriate, or I might back off and go for a walk. And so, when I feel myself going down to a four, I know how to get myself back on track. I know how to stop. I know how to think through things. I know how to feel better. And then that’s the immediate thing, Brandy, but the long-term thing is every night and every day, I have a very disciplined system that even gives me the chance to do that. I’m constantly thinking about how well I ask, listen, and give. I’m constantly thinking about what am I doing well? What can I do better? I’m constantly trying to anticipate – if I go into a certain meeting with certain people, or I go on a trip to a certain place, or I’m hanging out with this guy, or that gal, you know, what do I need to do to be my best self, to try to stay at an eight, striving for nine? And so, it’s a combination of immediate adjustment when I’m triggered, and ongoing, continuous discipline, day in and day out, night in night out. And that’s where it’s not easy, right? Because we’re well intentioned, but we don’t always want to do the work. Everybody wants to get better. Everybody wants to feel good. How many people want to do the work? I think it takes work to be happy. I think it takes work to be fulfilled, and you got to do the work. So, I now do the work at this point in life, and I’m never gonna stop because I like the good parts of this, and I don’t want the bad parts of not doing it.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah, you like the outcome.

[PAUL]:
Yeah.

[BILLY]:
Yeah. You’ve given us so many tangible things we can take away today. Dr. Paul Corona, I thank you for your work in the world, and the journey you’ve taken us on today.

[BRANDY]:
If there’s one thing you want to leave with our listeners, one tangible thing, because when I read your book, and when I watch your video, I can get overwhelmed very easily on all the things I need to work on.

[BILLY]:
It’s three minutes.

[BRANDY]:
I know, I know. But what is something very tangible, something that I could start doing today, that is going to help me start this journey?

[PAUL]:
Yeah. So first, Billy, thank you for your kind words. I’m honored to be part of this, and I hope we help your listeners and colleagues and friends. And Brandy, that’s a great question, sort of the ultimate question. To me, it comes down to this: I literally recommend that people post the ask, listen, give reminder at work, at home, on the refrigerator, on their computer, and read it every morning. And then they rate themselves every night on how well they do. How well did I ask, listen, and give today? And if they really want to do it, and that’s two things, and now I’m going to three even though you said one…

[BRANDY]:
Okay, that’s okay.

[PAUL]:
Get an accountability partner to talk with every week, how well did I do my asking, listening, giving? So, in other words…

[BILLY]:
Oh, it felt good because I had it in my car before I came in last night, so I feel like I’m getting an A on the course. Now, I’m gonna put an asterisk there, I came in and I probably did it at a two. I was going for an eight, like, I’m gonna go in and ask, and just give, and listen, and I’m just gonna be selfless. And then the environment shifted really quick, but I think that’s why we have to be intentional about it. But then I also have an accountability partner who will give it to me straight, and I can be honest and vulnerable with about how well, and not well, I’m doing these things in my life.

[BRANDY]:
Yeah, I had the exact opposite reaction. Mine was more of a visceral reaction of like, oh, I don’t want to do that, because that’s gonna be hard work. And I’m going to hear things I don’t necessarily want to hear even though the outcome is going to be better.

[PAUL]:
And most people, sorry to interrupt, sorry. I’m being very bad-Lee, I’m being very bad-Lee now, I’m interrupting.

[BILLY]:
No, no. Go ahead.

[PAUL]:
The vast majority of all people, successful people, either don’t have time or the desire to put in this work, and it’s normal. That’s why it’s hard. That’s why a lot of people don’t have true fulfillment. Now, again, I told you right up front, I am challenged by this myself, but I am never going back to my dissatisfiers and I love maintaining my fulfillment. So, I have real intense motives on each end of the spectrum. I tell people, don’t wait till you’re in too much pain before you do the work. And don’t think you’re going to have some fantasy where you now know exactly what your whole meaning of life is, and then you’re going to start doing the work. Most people are in between those two extremes. I’ve been on both ends of both extremes. So, I’m never going to the bad side and I want to stay on the good side. So, I say this to everybody, Brandy, it’s totally normal that we’re tired and distracted or we just don’t feel like doing it because we’ve had a day, and your days are incomprehensibly busy. And I say okay, don’t do it. Go ahead. Don’t do it. Don’t spend five minutes a day on this. Don’t review your plan in the morning – am I gonna ask, listen, and give well today? Don’t review it maybe a couple times during the day – how am I asking, listening, giving? Don’t rate yourself at night – how well did I ask, listen, and give? Don’t talk to somebody once a week for five minutes each, yeah, okay, don’t do it. Okay.

[BRANDY]:
It’s like Billy says a lot. He works with people that struggle with addictions and alcohol, and he’ll tell them, yeah, go out there and get yourself some more, just go ahead. If you’re not ready yet, go ahead. And I think about like, the telling, talking, and taking, like, I almost need to have a sticky note. Well, that’s what I’m gonna do, I’m gonna have a sticky note in one color, and then another one that says asking, listening, and giving so that I can remind myself, when I have people in my office or when I’m in meetings…

[BILLY]:
Or your husband’s in front of you.

[BRANDY]:
Even my children, same thing, because I have a hard time listening to kids. They talk a lot. I think sometimes I don’t want to hear it. But I know it’s important for them to be heard. And that’s easy, but complicated once again; easy information, but hard to do. But I like the outcome. I do know I feel better about myself, I feel better about what I’m doing at work, I feel better with my husband and with my kids and my friends when I am listening, and I don’t walk away from a conversation going, God, Brandy, why did you say that? Because you were just talking when you shouldn’t have been. Why did you act like that? You know, and if I am doing this, I will like myself better. And I think that’s part of it too.

[BILLY]:
That’s fulfillment. You hit the nail on the head, Paul, fulfillment. And when you start getting the results from the behavior, and you realize you sleep better at night, you move easier through the world. I think ultimately we all want that peace that passes understanding; we want that joy that…

[BRANDY]:
Comes from within.

[BILLY]:
Comes from within, and runs a little bit deeper, and is less shaken by the events that are swirling on around us. And you said it, I want to be fulfilled, I don’t want to go back to that person that I was. One thing I’ll put with it, it’s about progress, not perfection. If you set these up as a hardline task and rules, it will be miserable. But if you just set them out in front of you, as an ideal, and give yourself a little bit of room that you realize you’re going to get it right by doing it wrong sometimes, and realize what you need to do about doing what you don’t need to do, then we give ourselves enough grace to move along this journey, and we don’t ever really get there. We just fumble forward and strive for that place.

[PAUL]:
Yeah, exactly. Yeah, I couldn’t agree more.

[BILLY]:
Thank you so much, Paul, thank you for being with us today. And we can’t wait to collaborate with you more in the future. You were very gracious with your time and your energy today. We don’t take that lightly. Thank you very much.

[PAUL]:
I loved it. Thanks to both of you and I look forward to continuing our partnership, however I can be helpful.

[BRANDY]:
Absolutely. All right, thanks.

[BILLY]:
Are you ready to find freedom to be yourself as a beta male? Do you want permission and tools to be your best beta? Are you ready to join the revolution to find your strength as a beta? If you want to be comfortable in your own skin and be the most authentic beta male, then our free Beta Male Revolution course is for you. Sign up for free at betamalerevolution.com/course.

This podcast is designed to provide accurate and authoritative information in regard to the subject matter covered. This is given with the understanding that neither the host, Practice of the Practice, or the guest are providing legal, mental health, or other professional information. If you need a professional, you should find one.

Speak Your Mind

*




,

betamalerevolution@gmail.com
(903) 336-3484

Got Questions?
Send a Message!